W.Va. National Guard Still Active in Randolph County Post-Flooding

Jul 10, 2019

Overnight floodwaters washed away a section of this road between Job and Whitmer.
Credit Destiny Judy/The Inter-Mountain

The West Virginia National Guard is still active in the eastern part of the state, where last week Gov. Jim Justice declared a state of emergency following severe thunderstorms and flash flooding. 

This week, there have been at least 18 soldiers on the ground in Randolph County at a time, according to the Guard. They have been removing debris and helping with recovery mostly in the town of Harman, which authorities say has sustained some of the most damage.  

Harman’s water and sewer plants were hit especially hard, according to Mayor Jerry Teter. As of Wednesday, Teter said water lines have been restored, but several portions of the town’s sewer lines remain washed out and in need of repairs. 

Teter mentioned Harman’s library, community store, K-12 school and fire trucks all sustained some damage. Recovery could be expensive -- he reported the engineer’s estimate for sewer line repairs could be at least $1 million to $1.5 million. 

In the event of an emergency, Teter -- who also is the town’s fire chief -- said another fire department has loaned Harman a mini pumper. Any emergencies in the near future likely will require additional response from other nearby fire departments. 

Soldiers  have removed roughly 130 tons of stone and rock from the area so far, some of which has been taken to Job, West Virginia. 

The Guard said it also has provided over 150 cases of water, 30 food deliveries and eight stations for potable water. It plans to continue working in Randolph County throughout the week.