Using Humor To Unpack Appalachian Stereotypes

On this West Virginia Morning, what can hillbilly squids teach us about Appalachia? We find out, and we bring you an update on the coronavirus situation in West Virginia.  

With cases of the coronavirus expected to spike in West Virginia in the coming weeks, the state will delay its primary election. Dave Mistich has more.

During Wednesday’s press conference, Justice also announced all West Virginia schools will remain closed through April 30.

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In Huntington, the Marshall University School of Pharmacy has been making FDA approved hand sanitizer to help nonprofits who are quickly running out. We spoke with Dr. Kim Broedel-Zaugg, who is the chair of pharmacy practice, administration, and research.

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On the most recent episode of Inside Appalachia, associate producer Eric Douglas spoke to Chuck Reece, the host of “The Bitter Southerner Podcast.” The hour-long show is an offshoot of the popular online magazine devoted to the culture of the South. It is produced with the support of Georgia Public Broadcasting.

A recent episode featured conversations with writers who contributed to “Appalachian Reckoning: A Region Responds to Hillbilly Elegy.” The book, published in 2019, is a counterpoint to JD Vance’s controversial memoir “Hillbilly Elegy.” Podcast host Chuck Reece explores the reasons why many Appalachians were offended by Vance’s book.

In another episode he explores how stereotypes are used to crack jokes about Appalachians on an adult cartoon called “Squidbillies.” It’s an animated show that airs on Cartoon Network’s Adult Swim.

He discussed how “Squidbillies,” and maybe even comedy in general, helps us unpack how the world talks about Appalachia ... and how we Appalachians talk about ourselves.

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