How Appalachian Shale Gas Filled A Gap In Japan's Energy Needs

On this West Virginia Morning, the abundant drilling of our region's Marcellus and Utica shales has created a glut of natural gas. That means prices are at an all-time low. Producers eager to find new markets now ship gas overseas.  StateImpact Pennsylvania’s Susan Phillips traces the path of natural gas from the forests of northern Appalachia to Japan, where cheap Pennsylvania shale gas provides energy in the wake of a disaster.

Also on today’s show, adding plants and trees to the landscape could reduce air pollution by an average of 27 percent, according to a new study. Specialists in environmental science, engineering and geography spent three years analyzing thousands of counties across the country. They found that adding more plants is cheaper than most technologies at reducing air pollution. Roxy Todd spoke with the lead researcher, an engineer at Ohio State University named Bhavik Bakshi.

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