Following Investigation, Will Mine Safety Regulators Push for More Protections?

Jun 10, 2019

On this West Virginia Morning, as Appalachia's black lung epidemic grows worse, will mine safety regulators take action? We also hear the latest on an investigation into a sexual misconduct case by a former leader of the Roman Catholic Church in West Virginia, and we hear more on breastfeeding struggles for new mothers.

The bishop appointed by the Vatican to investigate the former leader of the Roman Catholic Church in West Virginia now has his own explaining to do. Glynis Board reports.

A Congressional committee will hear testimony this month on the epidemic of black lung among Appalachian coal miners. As an NPR investigation disclosed last year, more than 2,000 miners have been diagnosed with the worst form of the disease. Sydney Boles of the Ohio Valley ReSource visited a conference where researchers presented more evidence of the problem, and a union leader called for action. But mine safety regulators show little indication they will increase protection for miners.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that infants be exclusively breastfed for the first six months after birth, citing research that says breastfeeding protects the infant against diseases, obesity and stomach issues and helps the mother lose weight, and decrease risk of some cancers. But although breastfeeding is “natural,” for many women it’s not “easy.” And as Kara Lofton reports, women who struggle with breastfeeding can face intense pressure to be successful without support.

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Support for our news bureaus comes from West Virginia University, Concord University, and Shepherd University.

Our producer is Glynis Board.