Education, the State of Our Air, and Holding Patterns in the Legal System

Apr 24, 2019

A family in Charleston lost their 15-year-old almost two years ago. The man accused of killing him hasn’t been convicted or gone to trial yet.  We'll explore why on this West Virginia Morning.


A special session to address education in West Virginia is just around the corner. As Liz McCormick reports, lawmakers from the Eastern Panhandle are making plans to reintroduce controversial legislation next month.

The American Lung Association’s annual “State of the Air” report was released this week. As Brittany Patterson reports, while levels of fine particle pollution continue to improve across West Virginia, smog pollution remains a challenge.

And in November 2016 in Charleston, 62-year-old William Pulliam shot and killed James Means, who was 15.  Pulliam faces a first-degree murder charge. The matter made national headlines partly because Pulliam is white - Means was black.

On the latest episode of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s show Us & Them, host Trey Kay reviews the case, which was supposed to go to trial more than a year ago. There’ve been multiple delays. One was to assess Pulliam’s mental competency.

In an excerpt from the latest Us & Them episode called “Waiting for Justice,” Trey speaks with James Means’ family, who don’t understand why there have been so many delays to the trial.

West Virginia Morning is a production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting which is solely responsible for its content.

Support for our news bureaus comes from West Virginia University, Concord University, and Shepherd University.

West Virginia Morning is produced with help from Caitlin Tan, Jessica Lilly, Kara Lofton, Liz McCormick, Dave Mistich, Brittany Patterson and Roxy Todd.

Our news director is Jesse Wright, our producer is Glynis Board and our host is Teresa Wills.