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Revisiting ‘The Black Talk' As The Nation Grapples With Racial Injustice

061820 Revisiting ‘The Black Talk' As The Nation Grapples With Racial Injustice

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue hearing from and about kids. In this show, we highlight the conversation black families have with their teenagers about the police, and we share a special note from a mom to her kids about injustice and oppression. Also, we hear from a career school graduate in Fayette County who explores the reputation of career and trade schools as higher education institutions.  

In a recent episode of Inside Appalachia, we heard from students who attended career and trade courses in high school. One of these students is TJ Ellison. He just graduated from the Fayette Institute of Technology, also known as F.I.T., in Fayette County. This past year, the Inside Appalachia team mentored TJ's class, teaching them radio storytelling. For his first story, TJ decided to focus on his own experience of attending a career school. He set out to talk with his peers and teachers about how they feel about the reputation trade schools sometimes have. Here’s part of that story. 

How old were you when you first learned that police may perceive you as a threat? If you’ve never been told that, chances are you’re not African American. West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s program Us & Them released a show a few years back called “The Talk”. It was about how parents talk to kids about sex education. A listener heard that and suggested the team put together an episode about the “Black Talk.” It’s the talk black families have with their teenagers about how to conduct themselves, should they ever be stopped by the police.

We listen back to a portion of the Us & Them episode called “The Black Talk”, where host Trey Kay has conversations with black families about the sobering discussions they have with their teenage kids about how to stay safe when they encounter law enforcement.

West Virginia Morning is a production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting which is solely responsible for its content.

Support for our news bureaus comes from West Virginia University, Concord University, and Shepherd University.

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