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Battling for Black Lung Benefits, Creative Paths to Fresh Food & More

Inside Appalachia

A coal miner fighting for black lung benefits,

Creatively bringing fresh food to a city in West Virginia,

And, finding good use of an environmental pollutant.

Coal miner fights for benefits. Black lung disease has a long, crippling history in Appalachia. A former coal miner shares his battle for medical compensation after being diagnosed with the disease. Jessica Lilly  reports.

Promoting Dialogue Through Art. Theater is known as a way of conveying messages. One production hopes to continue the conversation after 10,000 gallons of MCHM leaked into the Elk River and poisoned the water for over 300,00 residents near Charleston. Liz Miccormick has more on this unique creation.

Mountain Lion Encounter. Cal Price was a newspaperman and outdoors writer from decades ago. He was fascinated with the idea that mountain lions still roam the mountains of West Virginia. As part of the Allegheny Front's Traveling 219 Project, Roxy Todd found a 1956 interview with the man who discusses his own encounter with the big cat.

Fresh nutrition. Wheeling, W.Va. deals with the same problems as many towns in Appalachia: abandoned buildings, impoverished areas subject to high crime rates, and drug epidemics. A group of young people hope to bring local food initiatives with the hopes of changing all that. Glynis Board reports.

Part of the pollution solution. Acid mine pollution is a real problem facing many in Appalachia. Some are finding ways to reuse this material that infects waterways. This week we revisit a story part of Allegheny Front’s Ripple effect series. Jennifer Szweda Jorda discovers how pollution is turned into pottery.

Professor helps the cause. A professor at Concord University is recycling the pollutant in his own pottery, finding it a useful education tool. Jared Kline has more.

Story that relates. The synopsis of filmmaker Danny Boyd’s latest graphic novel has some striking similarities to the coal reality of parts of Appalachia. Dave Mistich of sat down with the writer to find out more about the story with a dark background.

Jessica can be heard on Inside Appalachia and West Virginia Morning the station’s daily radio news program. You can reach her at jlilly@wvpublic.org