Zander Aloi

University of Charleston

On September 11, 1935, Morris Harvey College relocated from Barboursville to Charleston. Founded in 1888 by the Methodist Episcopal Church South, the school was originally known as Barboursville Seminary. The seminary struggled financially until Fayetteville coal operator Morris Harvey paid off the school’s debt. In appreciation, the institution changed its name to Morris Harvey College.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

  On August 6, 1864, a colony of eight Catholic nuns wound up their long treacherous wartime trek from Washington, D.C., to Parkersburg. The Sisters of the Visitation of Holy Mary established a teaching order in Parkersburg and, in 1867, founded a school for poor children. In 1900, they took possession of a new home and school located on the outskirts of Parkersburg. They named the large red-and-brick monastery DeSales Heights, in honor of St. Francis DeSales. Their former school building became home to St. Joseph’s Hospital.

Frances Brundage / Wikimedia Commons

Front Porch hosts Scott Finn, Laurie Lin, and Rick Wilson tell us which stories they'll be following in 2017:

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This week on the Front Porch, U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito gives her take on what the new Trump administration means for West Virginia.

We discuss recent resurgence of black lung among coal miners, what comes after the promised repeal of the Affordable Care Act, what can be done to build rural broadband networks, and more.

This week Scott, Laurie, and Rick are joined by guest Sharif Youssef. Youssef is the child of an Egyptian immigrant who grew up in the town of West Liberty, West Virginia, who now works as a producer on the popular podcast "99% Invisible" in the San Francisco Bay area.

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Jim Justice and Donald Trump both won big in West Virginia, and now it's time to get down to the real challenge of governing.

Steve Helber / AP File Photo

If the new President Trump repeals the Affordable Care Act, what would happen to West Virginians? If Clinton wins, what does that mean for coal?

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

When you think of the term "family values," chances are you think of the Republican Party, circa 1994. But recently, a labor-backed organization called "West Virginia Family Values" is funding attack ads against exclusively Republican targets.

On this week's Front Porch podcast, Laurie Lin suggests this is an attempt to muddy the waters and co-opt conservative messages.

Rick Wilson contests that the Republican Party neither holds a monopoly on family values, nor is it even particularly conservative.

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On this episode of the Front Porch, we deal with Donald Trump's claim that the race is rigged.

West Virginia had its share of election fraud in the past, but is it really at work today?

Also, what about another type of rigging - media bias?

Associated Press

The two leading candidates for governor attacked each other over unpaid bills and Donald Trump at the last major party debate. Who won, and will it matter?

Roman Behar / Wikimedia Commons

The sugar industry spent years denying the harm it does to the nation's health, according to investigative reports.  

This week on the Front Porch, Laurie and Rick speak with Mandy Curry, co-founder of Healthy Kids, Inc.

They discuss the sugar industry's attempt to downplay health risks associated with sugar consumption, and the effects this has had on the sugar content of the food we all eat.

Whitehouse.gov

On this episode of "The Front Porch," Scott, Laurie and Rick are joined by Ted Boettner of the West Virginia Center on Budget and Policy.

They discuss the effect the increasing number of professions requiring licensure or certification has on the state's economy. Are all these licenses really necessary? If not, what's the best way to eliminate the ones we don't need?

Also on the podcast, a discussion of "Sit-gate" in the 2016 gubernatorial race and more.

Subscribe to "The Front Porch" podcast on iTunes or however you listen to podcasts.

An Elegy Too Soon?

Sep 16, 2016
Mark Lynn Ferguson / The Revivalist

Does the bestselling book “Hillbilly Elegy” unfairly stereotype Appalachians as uniformly violent and poor?

That’s the case Mark Ferguson makes on this week’s episode of “The Front Porch.” Ferguson says things in most of Appalachia are improving, and the book paints an overly negative picture of our region.

The book has gotten a lot of buzz – we talked about it on The Front Porch recently and interviewed Vance for a recent episode of our show Inside Appalachia.

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It seems like everyone is angry about the huge price increase of Mylan's EpiPen. But what's the real cause?

On "The Front Porch" podcast, Laurie Lin blames federal regulations which inhibit market competition.

We also discuss the future of the Affordable Care Act. Both Bill Cole and Jim Justice, the two leading candidates in West Virginia's 2016 gubernatorial election, have said they will maintain the state's expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.