West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, most trees harvested in West Virginia are collected by small-scale logging operations with chain saws. But a growing number of companies use large, mechanized logging machines. In the next part of our occasional series on the timber industry, Jean Snedegar joins veteran logger Jerry Huffman on a job on Knobley Mountain, in Grant County.

Also this morning, we hear from 38-year-old Dave Hathaway, a laid-off coal miner. His story is part of our Struggle to Stay series, where we follow six people as they wrestle with the decision, do I stay or do I go? Unlike many others Dave is determined to STAY in Appalachia.

The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier went to visit him at his home in Greene County, Pennsylvania, just after his new baby was born to hear how his job search is going.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Joseph Reed has been a family doctor in Buckhannon, West Virginia for more than 50 years, and he still sees patients a couple days a month at St. Joseph’s hospital. In the next installment of our occasional series, Windows into Health Care, health reporter Kara Lofton talks to Reed about his career and how he’s seen medicine change over the last half century. 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, research on the benefits of breast-feeding continues to grow, with studies showing some positive health effects last into adulthood. Breast-feeding rates in the Ohio Valley, however, still lag behind the national average. Mary Meehan reports that efforts to help mothers in the region overcome breast-feeding challenges are beginning to pay off.

Gratisphotography

In response to our recent listener survey, West Virginia Public Broadcasting (WVPB) is excited to broadcast several new voices (and programs) on our statewide radio service, our live stream and our WVPB mobile app

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, lawmakers and union leaders are raising concerns about practices at the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration amid an increase in coal fatalities. As Becca Schimmel reports, officials are asking questions about MSHA’s compliance assistance program.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll meet the next person we’ll be following in our ongoing series, The Struggle to Stay. Dave Hathaway is a coal miner in the very southwestern corner of Pennsylvania.

Back in 2015, he lost his job at the coal mine he’d worked in. Then, he began looking for work. But what about Dave’s family? We teamed up with The Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier for this next installment of The Struggle to Stay.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the heroin and opioid crisis has reached stunning and heartbreaking heights across the nation...and Huntington, West Virginia’s drug overdose death rate sits at ten times the national average. A new film is out today that documents the severity of the problem – but also shines a light on the tireless work of three women trying to fight against a wave of desperation in their hometown. Produced in part by the Center for Investigative Reporting, Heroin(e) premieres today on Netflix. Dave Mistich spoke with film maker Elaine McMillion Sheldon about her film and what it’s like to document something that has affected so many of us in one way or another.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Environmental Protection Agency is reconsidering its approval of a controversial new form of herbicide that farmers say is damaging millions of acres of soybeans. Some 40 complaints have come from Ohio Valley farmers. Nicole Erwin reports that growers are looking for answers, and some suspect a quirk of the region’s climate may be increasing the risk of harm.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Experts and advocates gathered in Morgantown yesterday to talk about policy issues related to children’s health care. As Kara Lofton reports, most of the conversation was centered around the Children’s Health Insurance Program -- also known as CHIP.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, addiction specialists and state officials across the region say they've not heard from the Trump Administration and are still waiting to see an emergency plan to address the opioid crisis.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the out-migration of people leaving Appalachia is nothing new. Folks have been heading for the cities elsewhere for generations to find work and new opportunities.

Still, there are a few here who are determined to stay. But for them, staying is also a struggle. That’s why West Virginia Public Broadcasting and our podcast Inside Appalachia have been following six people for about a year to see how they are managing to stay… and if they can find a way to support their family here in Appalachia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, President Trump has nominated a retired West Virginia mine executive to lead the nation’s top mine safety agency. David Zatazelo is the former head of Rhino Resources, a coal company that was the focus of scrutiny by regulators in 2011 over safety violations.  
The nomination comes as mine safety experts are expressing concern about a rash of fatal coal mining accidents. Becca Schimmel reports that 12 miners have died this year -- eight of them in West Virginia and Kentucky.

Shepherd University

If you live in the Shepherdstown area and are a fan of NPR and West Virginia Public Broadcasting, you now have a new way to listen!

NPR's "Morning Edition" and "Mountain Stage" can now be heard on Shepherd University's radio station, 89.7 FM WSHC, thanks to an agreement between Shepherd and West Virginia Public Broadcasting (WVPB).

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, pipeline protesters have been camped along the Potomac River in Maryland and West Virginia all summer long. They don’t want to see the 3.5-mile TransCanada natural gas pipeline built underneath the river. Liz McCormick reports, pipeline supporters argue the line is critical to expanding natural gas resources to businesses and homes in the growing Eastern Panhandle. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, 50 years ago, there were about 65 birth facilities in West Virginia. Now, there are 24, which means increased drive-time for access to care for today’s pregnant mothers. As Kara Lofton reports, closure of these facilities also means decreased access to women’s health services.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the idea of building a natural gas storage hub in the region continues to gain traction. West Virginia University is set to release a report this week that explores the geologic possibilities of storing liquid natural gas products in underground reservoirs. Glynis Board attended a workshop that WVU hosted.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as rain continues to fall throughout southeastern Texas from hurricane Harvey, Glynis Board reports that federal aid workers are still assisting West Virginians struggling after July 2017 flooding in the northern part of the state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Ohio Valley residents have been asking government agencies for more than a decade to respond to science that links coal mining to health problems in nearby communities.

Sandstone Falls along the New River
New River Gateway

The National Park Service began searching for an Illinois man who disappeared while swimming in a rapids area Thursday, August 24th, with friends in West Virginia. His body was retrieved Friday evening.

Adobe Stock

A coal miner has died in West Virginia, the sixth mining fatality in the state this year.

In a news release, the U.S. Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) confirmed the fatality Friday at Carter Roag Coal Co.'s Pleasant Hill Mine on the Upshur-Randolph county border near Tallmansville, south of Buckhannon.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, this week's episode of Inside Appalachia celebrates getting outdoors with a new series called "Hidden Gems of Appalachia." Host Jessica Lilly spoke with a children's book author Katie Fallon, who wrote a book that's meant to encourage children to get outside and check out the unique birds you can find in West Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a new report spells out just how far Appalachia has fallen behind the rest of the country on key health measures. As The Ohio Valley ReSource's Mary Meehan explains, the gap continues to grow.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s back to school time, which also means a return to the cliques and social pecking order of high school.

Producer Trey Kay remembers how that dynamic played out among “hillers” and “creekers” at George Washington High School, in Charleston. He speaks with West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Scott Finn about his latest episode of our podcast, “Us & Them.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Human Trafficking hotline reports there were 19 cases of trafficking throughout West Virginia in 2016, but what about the cases undiscovered? Caroline Carey has more on new laws in the state and new programs to train officers on how to improve their ability to detect trafficking. 

Internal and State Police reviews are underway after two separate, unrelated deaths at West Virginia correctional facilities on Monday.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear the next part of our ongoing series, The Struggle to stay. For the past few months, we’ve met four West Virginians who are struggling to find a way to earn a living -- and debating whether the struggle is worth staying in Appalachia. Most recently, we’ve been hearing the story of Crystal Snyder, a mother of two who's working a new job with a program called Refresh Appalachia, which is helping her learn how to farm. Roxy Todd has been spending the past year and a half following Crystal and helping her document her story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the shocking events in Charlottesville, Virginia, last weekend are yet another reminder of deep division in America. More specifically, it seems like battles that ripped our nation apart 150 years ago, continue to smolder.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we pick back up with Crystal Snyder, a single mother of two, who lost her job a couple of years ago. But she didn't lose hope. Roxy Todd has more of Crystal's story in this next installment of The Struggle to Stay.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Last week on West Virginia Morning, we met Crystal Snyder, a single mother of two who says she wants to stay in West Virginia, and raise her children here. As a single mom, it’s on Crystal to provide for her family, which is hard to do without a job. A couple of years ago, she lost her job at a T-shirt factory. That’s where Roxy Todd picks back up with Crystal’s Struggle to Stay story today.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the Trump administration is scrapping the Waters of the U.S. rule -- a clean-water regulation advanced by the Obama administration. The rule was meant to clarify federal authority over small streams, and its repeal raises questions about how to best protect those waterways. Amid the swirling uncertainty, an unlikely group of clean water champions has emerged in western Kentucky’s farmland.  The Ohio Valley ReSource's Nicole Erwin reports that people along the Little River have some big ideas for water conservation.

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