West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after weeks of speculation about the contents of an education reform bill, lawmakers in the West Virginia Senate are now releasing details of the legislation. Widely known as an “omnibus” bill, the legislation is set to offer pay raises and address health care, but also offer additional components leaders of teacher and service personnel unions oppose. Dave Mistich has more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s energy and environment reporter, Brittany Patterson, recently visited Summers County. She spoke with a family affected by natural gas pipelines built nearby. Pipeline supporters point to millions of dollars in economic benefits and thousands of jobs. But some residents living in the path of these projects have seen their way of life radically altered.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawmakers argued over an idea to create a grant program to pay off tuition for community college students, and community members voiced concerns supporting and opposing a bill to alter medical care management for foster children in the state.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

President of the West Virginia Board of Education David Perry joined Suzanne Higgins host The Legislature Today last night to discuss some of the biggest education issues, concerns and ideas for this legislative session, including an omnibus education bill expected to be taken up this week in Senate Education. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, graduate students from the University of Pennsylvania are looking for a solution to the complex water infrastructure challenges facing underserved communities in places like southern West Virginia. As part of their solutions driven-project, a team of six students visited McDowell County to tour the water plants. Inside Appalachia host, Jessica Lilly, has that story.

Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Public Broadcasting will be part of the 2019 Report for America initiative that will allow WVPB to add a full-time multimedia reporter to its news staff, starting in June.

The position will be based in Charleston, covering southern West Virginia, with a focus on public affairs and state government.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On last night’s episode of The Legislature Today, senior reporter Dave Mistich spoke with Senate Finance Chairman Craig Blair and House Minority Finance Chairman Mick Bates about the current fiscal situation in West Virginia -- including a look at possibilities for the nearly $186 million-dollar surplus announced in December’s revenue report. We hear an exerpt from the interview on this West Virginia Morning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice made clear in his 2019 State of the State Address that he wants to see medical marijuana in West Virginia. But he also said he would never support recreational marijuana use. Senate President Mitch Carmichael and House Speaker Roger Hanshaw joined host Suzanne Higgins on The Legislature Today last night for a discussion about some of the top issues this legislative session, including the debate over marijuana. We have an excerpt from that interview.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, during this past weekend, a horrific fire in Clay County claimed the lives of four foster children. It put the spotlight on a child welfare system in crisis. West Virginia lawmakers have been working throughout interim session to address the significant needs of the state's foster care system. Now, they bring that work into the regular state Legislative session. Glynis Board brings us a closer look at the crisis from the front lines.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, in his State of the State address to the West Virginia Legislature last week, Gov. Jim Justice outlined a series of policy proposals, including one that seemed to come out of the blue.

“We need to develop multiple lakes within West Virginia,” Justice said.

Energy and environment reporter Brittany Patterson wanted to find out more about the history of this idea and what it would take to add lakes to the Mountain State.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The 2019 West Virginia Legislative session is now in full swing, and West Virginia Public Broadcasting is bringing you in-depth coverage every weekday night on our program “The Legislature Today.” In last night’s episode, host Suzanne Higgins spoke with House Minority Leader Tim Miley and Senate Minority Leader Roman Prezioso about Gov. Jim Justice’s third State of the State Address.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Gov. Jim Justice promised to capitalize on West Virginia’s recently reported economic turnaround in his third State of the State address. Justice focused on education, roads, the state’s drug problem, and rollbacks on taxes. Dave Mistich reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, two Ohio Valley lawmakers have introduced a bill in Congress to shore up coal miners’ health and pension benefits and restore funding for the federal black lung trust fund. Becca Schimmel reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, needle exchanges are a proven way to help slow the spread of HIV and hepatitis C. They also help connect people with substance abuse disorder to recovery and treatment.

Despite approval by Virginia lawmakers, there are only three exchanges operating in that state. One roadblock is getting permission from local law enforcement.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, three workplace deaths in late December 2018 provided a grim end of the year for the coal mining industry. As the Ohio Valley ReSource's Jeff Young reports, 12 people died in the nation’s coal mines even as mining employment dropped to a record low.

On this West Virginia Morning, thousands of visitors come to West Virginia every winter for outdoor recreation. The state is home to five ski resorts, and winter sports generate an estimated $250 million in economic benefits annually. But warmer, wetter winters are reducing the ideal conditions for producing and keeping snow on the ground. Energy and environment reporter Brittany Patterson recently spent some time learning about how climate change will likely impact West Virginia’s winter sports.

We asked you to ask, you've asked, now we need you to decide which ask to answer!

Welcome to Wild, Wondering West Virginia, a new series devoted to answering questions about the Mountain State. You submit the questions, and the public votes on which ones they want us to investigate. WVPB will work together with the asker to find the answer. 

On this West Virginia Morning, for many teenagers, nothing is more captivating than the steady stream of notifications on their phones. Almost 95% of American teens own a smartphone, and 45 percent say that they spend most of their time online. As part of an Appalachia Health News youth reporting project, Fayette Institute of Technology High School Seniors Chloe Perdue and Keesha Moore examine how social media can affect teens’ interactions.

On this West Virginia Morning, our Wild, Wondering West Virginia campaign to answer questions about the Mountain State led us to a question from Nancy Taylor. She wanted to know what the state was like during the last ice age. Environmental reporters Brittany Patterson and Glynis Board were really excited about exploring this idea. Research led them to a unique place in the state which is a remnant of the ice age - Cranesville Swamp. They went to experience it for themselves and brought back this report.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we get a sneak peek at this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, where we’ll share some of our favorite holiday stories. We’ll take you to the tiny mountain town of Helvetia, West Virginia, which has a connection to the beloved Christmas classic, “Silent Night.” Eric Douglas and Molly Born report.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them, in which host Trey Kay responds to a cyclical flare up of social media comments related to a “War on Christmas.” Hubbub over politically correct holiday greetings, or nativity scenes on government property, traditionalists and secularists are often at odds.

In this excerpt, Trey speaks with a childhood friend who worries the religious aspects of Christmas are being eroded from the holiday.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, NPR’s Howard Berkes reported this week that more than 2,000 coal miners are now suffering from the most severe form of black lung disease, called pulmonary massive fibrosis. And despite clear warnings, industry regulators did not stop it.
The investigation caps a nearly four-decade career for Berkes, who is retiring from NPR this month.
The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Jeff Young spoke with Berkes about how he reported this story, and why his reporting kept taking him back to Appalachia’s coal country.

What sort of creatures called Cranesville Swamp in WV home during the Ice Age?
Brittany Patterson / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Exciting news! We at West Virginia Public Broadcasting have received some excellent questions during the inaugural kick-off of our Wild, Wondering West Virginia project. We want to know what questions you have about the Mountain State, and here are just a few of the great questions we've already received:

Just in time for the holidays, Inside Appalachia takes a trip down memory lane with two family businesses in West Virginia with deep cultural traditions. Join host, Jessica Lilly, as she talks with broom maker James Shaffer and grist man, Larry Mustain, about what the future holds for their business and for them.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, health reporter Kara Lofton spent the semester working with fifth-graders at Valley Elementary school on a youth-reporting project. In the following audio postcard, we’ll hear from six of those students about how holiday traditions help them feel connected to their families and their communities.

Pianist Bob Thompson returns with 26th edition of Joy to the World, featuring guest-vocalist Paula Cole.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as Congress nears the end of its session, the clock is ticking on a tax that supports the federal Black Lung Disability Trust Fund. The fund provides benefits to tens of thousands of sick coal miners in the Ohio Valley. If Congress does not extend the tax, the fund will likely slide deeper into debt just as the region is seeing a surge in new cases of black lung.

As The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Becca Schimmel reports, the decision is largely in the hands of Kentucky senator Mitch McConnell.

John Raby / AP Photo

At the risk of stating the obvious, 2018 was an eventful year. The year started with a legislative session interrupted by a strike and didn’t let up from there. West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s dedicated news team met the challenging onslaught of seemingly endless news head on.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, journalist and professor Bonnie Stewart joins us to talk about the recent 50th anniversary of the Farmington Mine Disaster.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning, we have another segment in an occasional series called Recovery Stories –– conversations from the heart of the nation’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubrey and Bob Lloyd. They first met at a Dayton, Ohio, support group. Dustin’s in recovery. And Bob’s adult son struggles with substance use disorder.

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