West Virginia Public Broadcasting

We asked you to ask, you've asked, now we need you to decide which ask to answer!

Welcome to Wild, Wondering West Virginia, a new series devoted to answering questions about the Mountain State. You submit the questions, and the public votes on which ones they want us to investigate. WVPB will work together with the asker to find the answer. 

On this West Virginia Morning, for many teenagers, nothing is more captivating than the steady stream of notifications on their phones. Almost 95% of American teens own a smartphone, and 45 percent say that they spend most of their time online. As part of an Appalachia Health News youth reporting project, Fayette Institute of Technology High School Seniors Chloe Perdue and Keesha Moore examine how social media can affect teens’ interactions.

On this West Virginia Morning, our Wild, Wondering West Virginia campaign to answer questions about the Mountain State led us to a question from Nancy Taylor. She wanted to know what the state was like during the last ice age. Environmental reporters Brittany Patterson and Glynis Board were really excited about exploring this idea. Research led them to a unique place in the state which is a remnant of the ice age - Cranesville Swamp. They went to experience it for themselves and brought back this report.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we get a sneak peek at this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, where we’ll share some of our favorite holiday stories. We’ll take you to the tiny mountain town of Helvetia, West Virginia, which has a connection to the beloved Christmas classic, “Silent Night.” Eric Douglas and Molly Born report.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the latest episode of Us & Them, in which host Trey Kay responds to a cyclical flare up of social media comments related to a “War on Christmas.” Hubbub over politically correct holiday greetings, or nativity scenes on government property, traditionalists and secularists are often at odds.

In this excerpt, Trey speaks with a childhood friend who worries the religious aspects of Christmas are being eroded from the holiday.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, NPR’s Howard Berkes reported this week that more than 2,000 coal miners are now suffering from the most severe form of black lung disease, called pulmonary massive fibrosis. And despite clear warnings, industry regulators did not stop it.
The investigation caps a nearly four-decade career for Berkes, who is retiring from NPR this month.
The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Jeff Young spoke with Berkes about how he reported this story, and why his reporting kept taking him back to Appalachia’s coal country.

What sort of creatures called Cranesville Swamp in WV home during the Ice Age?
Brittany Patterson / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Exciting news! We at West Virginia Public Broadcasting have received some excellent questions during the inaugural kick-off of our Wild, Wondering West Virginia project. We want to know what questions you have about the Mountain State, and here are just a few of the great questions we've already received:

Just in time for the holidays, Inside Appalachia takes a trip down memory lane with two family businesses in West Virginia with deep cultural traditions. Join host, Jessica Lilly, as she talks with broom maker James Shaffer and grist man, Larry Mustain, about what the future holds for their business and for them.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, health reporter Kara Lofton spent the semester working with fifth-graders at Valley Elementary school on a youth-reporting project. In the following audio postcard, we’ll hear from six of those students about how holiday traditions help them feel connected to their families and their communities.

Pianist Bob Thompson returns with 26th edition of Joy to the World, featuring guest-vocalist Paula Cole.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as Congress nears the end of its session, the clock is ticking on a tax that supports the federal Black Lung Disability Trust Fund. The fund provides benefits to tens of thousands of sick coal miners in the Ohio Valley. If Congress does not extend the tax, the fund will likely slide deeper into debt just as the region is seeing a surge in new cases of black lung.

As The Ohio Valley ReSource’s Becca Schimmel reports, the decision is largely in the hands of Kentucky senator Mitch McConnell.

John Raby / AP Photo

At the risk of stating the obvious, 2018 was an eventful year. The year started with a legislative session interrupted by a strike and didn’t let up from there. West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s dedicated news team met the challenging onslaught of seemingly endless news head on.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, journalist and professor Bonnie Stewart joins us to talk about the recent 50th anniversary of the Farmington Mine Disaster.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning, we have another segment in an occasional series called Recovery Stories –– conversations from the heart of the nation’s opioid crisis. Today, we hear a conversation between Dustin Aubrey and Bob Lloyd. They first met at a Dayton, Ohio, support group. Dustin’s in recovery. And Bob’s adult son struggles with substance use disorder.

The West Virginia Supreme Court chamber
West Virginia Judiciary

Gov. Jim Justice has appointed a Raleigh County judge to serve a temporary term on the state Supreme Court.

John A. Hutchison of Beckley will serve until a 2020 special election, with the winner serving the remainder of Justice Allen Loughry's term through 2024. The court had a vacancy after Loughry resigned.

In a news release, Justice called Hutchison "one of the most conservative, respected jurists in the state of West Virginia."

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

You might’ve heard Trey Kay, host of WVPB’s podcast Us & Them engage in a conversation during the past several weeks, in a series called “Red State Blue State”,  about the culture differences between West Virginia and southern California. In the latest episode of Us & Them, Trey finds kindred spirits in a trio of Latino comedians who call themselves "Culture Clash". Just like Trey, these comedians explore the space between cultural divides. We hear an excerpt of that episode on this West Virginia Morning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the petrochemical industry is promising economic development in many Ohio Valley towns where it’s sorely needed. Like East Liverpool, Ohio, near the Pennsylvania border. There, The Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports, the town’s welcoming this new industry while still living with pollution from decades-old facilities.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a growing body of research shows that people living near mountaintop removal coal mines face increased risks of disease linked to pollutants in air and water.

A new report from a human rights group argues that the mining industry has tried to suppress the science about health risks and has forced coalfield communities to take on the industry’s costs.

Ohio Valley ReSource reporter Sydney Boles visited residents who are hoping for clear answers and clean water.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a bill we followed closely during the 2018 legislative session could resurface in the 2019 session – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a community and technical college. It was often referred to as the free community and technical college bill, and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginia Public Broadcasting reporter Molly Born and Charleston Gazette-Mail reporter Caity Coyne have been working on a series of stories about water infrastructure issues in the southern coalfields. They’re both fellows with Report for America, an initiative that aims to strengthen local journalism.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we begin an occasional series we’re calling ​Recovery Stories –– conversations from the heart of the nation’s opioid crisis. Today, we meet Dayton, Ohio-native Andre Lewis and his friend and recovery sponsor, William Roberts. William works in social services in Dayton and is a church pastor with nearly three decades in recovery himself. As Andre explains in this story, he first met William at a treatment program for struggling addicts.

American Graduate: Building West Virginia's Workforce is now available to watch online.

As the Mountain State's skilled workforce ages and manufacturing evolves to use technology, there are job opportunities in West Virginia that require some training or certification, but not a 4-year degree.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the abundance of natural gas from fracking could soon fuel a new petrochemical industry in the Ohio Valley. A massive facility proposed for Belmont County, Ohio, brings both the promise of economic gains and environmental risks. Reporter Brittany Patterson attended a recent public hearing, where residents spoke up about what kind of future they want for the Ohio Valley.

What do YOU wonder about West Virginia? What if YOU could choose West Virginia Public Broadcasting's next story?

Welcome to Wild, Wondering West Virginia, a new series devoted to answering questions about the Mountain State. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, something unusual happened last month: Congress passed an opioid law -- and did it with overwhelming bipartisan support … in both chambers. It was a broad, $8 billion bill that expands access to health services and recovery centers. So it looks like addressing the opioid epidemic is one thing Democrats and Republicans can agree on. And that’s the topic of this week’s Red State, Blue State -- our weekly chat between Cherry Glazer of KCRW in California and West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Trey Kay.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, one of the biggest battles in drug treatment and recovery is overcoming stigma. For our final segment in a series on the failed Charleston needle exchange, we take a look at how its closure has affected the community's perception of harm reduction policy. Kara Lofton reports that things like harm reduction, safety and crime have become as much about politics as public health.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, current best practices for harm reduction programs include a couple provisions: no retractable needles should be distributed, patients should get as many needles as possible regardless of how many they bring back, and barriers to accessing needles should be as low as possible. But what happens when those recommendations are at odds with community acceptance for the practices? Kara Lofton reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue our new series exploring the impact of Charleston’s now-closed harm reduction program. We hear from two programs in the state that discuss what that closure has done for their own reputation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we continue a series exploring best practices for harm reduction programs in the state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, one of the byproducts of the opioid crisis is an abundance of needle litter. In a new series, we explore why the state's largest harm reduction program shut down and how perception, stigma and politics around that closure is impacting other programs around the state.

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