West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, homelessness is often considered an urban problem. But a recent NPR survey found a third of rural Americans say homelessness is a problem in the communities. In the first in a series of reports from the Ohio Valley ReSource Mary Meehan explores rural homelessness. Those working on the issues say it remains largely hidden, even as the region's opioid crisis pushes more people into need.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the 2019 Veterans Affairs Mission Act went into effect earlier this month. It makes emergency and specialized care available to more U.S. veterans. The act promises to provide less red tape and greater satisfaction and predictability for veterans. The legislation passed through Congress easily with broad bipartisan support and President Trump signed it into law.

Robert Wilkie, the Veterans Affairs Secretary since last July, took over the VA during significant turmoil. He spoke over the phone with Eric Douglas about changes to the VA and the challenges the organization still faces.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, mead is often associated with Vikings and medieval feasts. In the 1960s, it made a brief resurgence thanks to renaissance festivals. But in the last couple of years, there’s been a new revival in mead. According to the American Mead Makers Association, it’s the fastest-growing alcoholic beverage in the country. Brittany Patterson spent some time with some West Virginia mead makers and learned how the Mountain State’s unique charm is influencing their craft.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the latest episode of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them podcast focuses on the subject of sexual assault on college campuses. This is an emotionally charged and a delicate subject. Our assistant news director, Glynis Board, spoke with Us & Them Host Trey Kay about the episode titled “Reckoning with Sexual Assault: Righting a Wrong.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, senior reporter Dave Mistich joins host Teresa Wills live to discuss the latest legislative action on education reform in the state House of Delegates.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear how a new facility in Berkeley County is trying to tackle landfill overflow by turning trash into a fuel source. We also hear a discussion with John Temple, author of the new book Up in Arms.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore how some transgender families celebrate Father’s Day, we hear a story from this week’s Inside Appalachia podcast featuring craft breweries, and we listen to this week’s Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear the final story in our series on breastfeeding, the second part of a two-part series on water infrastructure issues in Kentucky, and we hear a discussion with singer-songwriter Tristen Marie Gaspadarek.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an increase in heavier rain events is putting stress on Kentucky’s aging water infrastructure, and we hear another installment from this week’s Inside Appalachia episode on breastfeeding.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear more from this week’s Inside Appalachia episode on breastfeeding. We explore the guilt mothers can sometimes face when trying to breastfeed and why many low-income mothers often choose formula over breastfeeding. We also have a discussion with Matthew Ferrence, author of “Appalachia North.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as Appalachia's black lung epidemic grows worse, will mine safety regulators take action? We also hear the latest on an investigation into a sexual misconduct case by a former leader of the Roman Catholic Church in West Virginia, and we hear more on breastfeeding struggles for new mothers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we explore breastfeeding, we hear the latest from the statehouse, and we bring you this week’s Mountain Stage “Song of the Week.”

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Rockwool has become a household name in the Eastern Panhandle, and it sparks a flurry of discussion and debate. The European-based stone wool manufacturing plant is under construction in Ranson, Jefferson County. That, despite pushback from residents on the grounds of environmental concerns and the plant’s proximity to an elementary school.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the days get longer, a familiar sight has returned to the skies at dusk: bats. Bats help farmers -- and the rest of us -- by eating about a million bugs a year, per bat. But because of white nose syndrome, there are fewer bats these days. In Pennsylvania, the disease has pushed some species to the statewide endangered list. As the Allegheny Front's Reid Frazier of  reports, scientists are testing a new method to try to save these animals.

Dorsey Cutright

Dorsey Cutwright won first place among second graders in West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s 2019 Writers Contest. Dorsey came into our studios to record his story, Adventure of a Lifetime.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, data on the Ohio Valley’s addiction crisis show that the problem is often more profound and persistent in communities that are economically distressed. As part of the Ohio Valley ReSource series, “Working Toward Recovery,” Aaron Payne visited an Ohio community tackling both problems.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the West Virginia Senate is set to put a long, sweeping and controversial education reform measure to a vote today. Yesterday, the upper chamber considered amendments to Senate Bill 1039, which has been touted by Senate President Mitch Carmichael as the Student Success Act.

Senior reporter Dave Mistich joins Teresa Wills to discuss the measure, what changes have been made to the bill and what is expected moving forward.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Jeremy Farley is a self-taught expert on Appalachian storytelling.  He grew up in Wythe County, Virginia, and is the founder of Appalachian Magazine. Jeremy is also one of 10 new reporters with the Folkways Reporting Corps. Inside Appalachia host, Jessica Lilly, recently sat down with Jeremy to talk about Appalachian Magazine, and his new position on the team. We hear part of that conversation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, after almost 15 years, the West Virginia Legislature came through on a promise made to the state’s horse and dog racing industries. As Liz McCormick reports, revenues that had been allocated elsewhere is flowing back to those industries. As part of our occasional series, “Effective from Passage,” we explore Senate Bill 13, which officially went into effect late last week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Inside Appalachia host Jessica Lilly is directing a new initiative to expand our arts and cultural reporting throughout central Appalachia, and helping her is our new reporter, Caitlin Tan. The two sat down to talk about what Caitlin has discovered during her first few months of living here and reporting on folklife for Inside Appalachia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Greensboro is a small town in southern Pennsylvania, just across the West Virginia border. It sits on the banks of the Monongahela river, surrounded by small hills and patches of trees.

Over the years the town has weathered boom and busts of a pottery industry, river trade, and coal.  Lately, it’s been more bust than boom.

But now, some artists are trying to stimulate the local economy using what they know best: creativity. Our folklife reporter Caitlin Tan visited the Greensboro Art Cooperative to find out more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the world waits for resolution from the Trump Administration’s trade war with China, it’s a tough time to be a farmer -- especially a soybean farmer. Soybeans are a $40 billion business in the U.S. But the crop price plummeted last year because of the trade war. Farmers are desperate for anything that can help keep their profits up. Like weedkillers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, There’s a strong historical connection between Appalachia and Wales.

Many of our ancestors migrated from Wales to Appalachia, both regions once heavily depended on the coal industry and both have a strong mountain culture -- a culture that includes music, art and storytelling.

This month at the Monongalia Arts Center in Morgantown, you can see an expansive art exhibit dedicated to the Welsh-Appalachian connection. Our folklife reporter, Caitlin Tan, has more.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we have an update on the ongoing special legislative session, where issues related to public education lingered heavily in the background, and at times worked their way to the front of the day's agenda.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the Ohio Valley suffers some of the nation’s highest rates of addiction and overdose deaths, a growing movement shows promise for those in recovery. Many are finding employment and support in food services and farms that specifically hire people who are recovering from addiction. Brittany Patterson has the story.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is working to clean up a former mining equipment operation in Fayette County, known as the Shaffer site. The agency announced this week it has added Minden to its national priorities list of superfund sites and hosted a community conversation around their next steps. Roxy Todd was there and has this report.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, lawmakers are scheduled to return to the Capitol in Charleston at 2 p.m. on Monday, May 20, to reconvene a special session on education betterment that was called months ago. But Republican leaders have yet to agree on exactly what kinds of reforms will be considered. So, as Dave Mistich reports, instead of focusing on education, the special session will likely address bills Governor Jim Justice vetoed on technical grounds.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, following an investigation started five years ago, the U.S. Department of Justice determined West Virginia is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act. That’s because it has too many children with serious emotional or behavioral disorders in out-of-state residential facilities. As Kara Lofton reports, the Justice Department and the state have agreed to a plan to bring West Virginia into compliance with that law within five years.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the department of education released a 33-page report titled West Virginia’s Voice last week. It presents education reform ideas collected from a series of forums held around the state.

The department concludes that “West Virginia’s education system is not broken,” but identifies four priorities for improving public education: increasing pay for all school employees, increasing funding for mental health professionals, incentivizing high-performing schools by providing local flexibility to explore educational innovations, and funding supplemental pay for shortage areas, especially math instruction.

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