West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A family in Charleston lost their 15-year-old almost two years ago. The man accused of killing him hasn’t been convicted or gone to trial yet.  We'll explore why on this West Virginia Morning.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A Glenville State College professor set out to turn his experiences working in a mental asylum into a novel.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

In southeast Ohio, marijuana was once something officials tried to eliminate. Now officials hope medical marijuana can replace lost jobs and revenue.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia looks at a disease that at least 2,000 former miners struggle with -- black lung. An NPR investigation found that miners are finding it tough to get help from doctors, lawyers, coal companies, and many lawmakers.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, West Virginians will soon be allowed to give more money to political groups in the state. Political donors will be allowed to give $2,800 to candidate committees, $5,000 to political action committees and $10,000 to state party executive committees.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the rate of Alzheimer’s is increasing in every state. Researchers, including some at WVU, are working on a cure, but the cause of Alzheimer’s is still poorly understood, let alone reversing or stopping it. And as Kara Lofton reports, there’s no end in sight for families struggling with the disease.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Russian aluminum company Rusal announced its plans to invest in a northeast Kentucky manufacturing plant. As the Ohio Valley ReSource's Sydney Boles reports, the investment is the company’s first U.S. project following relief from federal sanctions.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, hemp products are becoming hot sellers, especially those containing CBD. The compound is derived from cannabis but does not intoxicate a user. Instead, users say, CBD has a wide array of health benefits. And some Ohio Valley businesses are betting big on CBD sales. But as the Ohio Valley ReSource's Liam Niemeyer reports, there’s little evidence for the health claims. And researchers worry that CBD sales are far ahead of the science.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a fire at a US Steel plant crippled its ability to control its air pollution in December. For three months, the Pittsburgh area was blanketed with releases of sulfur dioxide much higher than usual, and thousands reported suffering from poor air quality. Last week, the steelmaker finished repairing its pollution control equipment. For State Impact Pennsylvania, the Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier reports that the worries about air pollution and its health impacts, remain.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, an almost decade-long effort to build a major underground natural gas liquids storage facility in the Ohio Valley saw movement this week, as state and federal politicians announced initiatives to move it forward. But as Brittany Patterson reports, not everyone is on board.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, four current and former Richwood officials were indicted and arrested earlier this month on charges they embezzled money from the city. Some of those charges are related to the misuse of public funds after a devastating flood in June 2016. Dave Mistich spoke with state Auditor John B. McCuskey about his office’s investigation into Richwood and other efforts to combat fraud around the state.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning, Ken Burns joins us to talk about making the film, “Country Music: A Film by Ken Burns,” the impact it had on him, and what he has come to understand about the power of country music.

 


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

An Ohio Valley ReSource analysis of federal mine safety data shows that the companies belonging to the family of West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice owe $4.3 million in unpaid mine safety violations. That is far more than the companies owed when Justice ran for governor in 2016, when he pledged to make good on such debts. As Brittany Patterson reports, the Justice companies continue to have the highest unpaid mine safety debt in the nation.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, 800 elementary school students gathered at Marshall University on Thursday for the 11th annual Brain Expo. Kara Lofton reports the expo is designed as an opportunity to bring science out of the classroom and give third-sixth graders hands-on learning.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, emergency personnel in Wheeling were responded to more than 130 overdose calls last year.  That’s about 20 more than they received in 2017. Overdose deaths doubled. The city decided to respond by enlisting the help of people who understand this trouble better than anyone else. Corey Knollinger reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the West Virginia Treasury Department has joined a coalition of 27 states in an effort to tackle the nation’s student debt crisis. News director Jesse Wright spoke with State Treasurer John Perdue about the initiative and how parents can help support their children’s higher education aspirations from birth.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we hear the next installment of our occasional series Windows into Health Care. Health reporter Kara Lofton speaks with hospice nurse Lori Carter. Carter has been a hospice nurse for 20 years. She said for her, and for many of the hospice nurses she knows, the work is a calling.

Carter says some of what she does is straight-up nursing – managing pain, dressing wounds and addressing symptoms of end-stage disease. But the more subtle part of the job is helping families navigate one of the most intimate and emotional times of their lives.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, last month, President Donald Trump signed into law the Natural Resources Management Act, a public lands bill that reauthorized a little-known, but important program -- the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Millions of dollars from the LWCF have been spent across the Ohio Valley.

As Brittany Patterson reports, reauthorization of this program is a rare bipartisan win, and some of the bill’s provisions will make long-awaited public lands projects in the region a reality.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Trey Kay -- host of WVPB’s program Us & Them -- first heard about a transgender woman in Charleston, West Virginia in 2014. Anne Kelly Skinner -- formerly Greg Skinner -- was in the process of transitioning from male to female. Trey got in touch with Anne and they ended up talking about what we’ll hear in this excerpt from our show Us & Them -- the way Anne talks.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This morning we pay homage to women who have worked to preserve the state’s environment -- especially the water.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, Wheeling resident and entrepreneur Brian Joseph posed the latest question in our ongoing Wild, Wondering West Virginia series. He asked us to tell the story of what some say are the oldest mountains in the world -- the Appalachian Mountains -- including sister mountain range, the Atlas Mountains.

This question won our online voting round, so we decided to visit with Joseph to gain a bit more insight into his curiosity. Glynis Board reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The MARC Train, or Maryland Area Regional Commuter, serves about 250 West Virginians who live in Berkeley and Jefferson Counties. The train has been serving the area for more than 30 years, but Maryland has always paid the bills. West Virginia was only responsible for upkeep of its three West Virginia stations.

That changed recently.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, PBS NewsHour Student Reporting Labs began a series this year called Opportunity in America from its national network of teen reporters. It examines the tough choices young people face these days.

A team from Morgantown High School led by senior Alia King and teacher Tiphani Davis worked with SRL producers to investigate how young people are searching for economic mobility. We hear the story the team of students produced, which aired on West Virginia Public Broadcasting television stations last week.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, it’s not every day you meet someone who’s turned their hobby into their livelihood, and that they still pursue it with passion.

But Jane Gilchrist was that person. She was a hand weaver in Harrison County who turned her love of fabrics into a business. She was able to preserve a craft that hadn’t been a necessity since the pioneer days in Appalachia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a new apprenticeship program through the West Virginia Folklife Program is helping connect apprentices with master traditional artists in West Virginia. We heard from several of these folklorists in a recent episode of Inside Appalachia called Appalachia’s Folkways: Handmade and Passing it On. Roxy Todd has a story about how one of the people involved in the apprenticeship program is learning old-time fiddle music.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, about 300 people gathered inside the Islamic Association of West Virginia last night to hold a vigil in memory of the 50 people who were killed in New Zealand last Friday. Religious leaders from several different faiths were among those who spoke inside the South Charleston Mosque, as Roxy Todd reports.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Monring, people can be suspicious of end-of-life care, especially Hospice. There’s a perception that when Hospice comes in, it’s only for the last hours before someone dies. In the final story of the series about aging in Appalachia, Kara Lofton found that for some families, Hospice services can not only help the dying live, but ease the caregiving burden on their families for weeks or months.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, as the Trump administration’s trade talks continue with China and other countries, farmers are feeling the pain from the president’s year-long trade war. Tariffs on agricultural goods are compounding problems caused by low crop prices and over-production. The Ohio Valley ReSource's Liam Niemeyer reports that small farms are suffering the most.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This West Virginia Morning features a few stories that illustrate some changes throughout the region, economically, legislatively, and culturaly.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The partial meltdown of one of Three Mile Island’s nuclear reactors 40 years ago this month left areas of the facility highly radioactive. Along came a young group of researchers with an idea to send in robots to fix the damage. StateImpact Pennsylvania’s Amy Sisk reports that their work helped expand the fledgling field of robotics.

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