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Trey Kay

Independent Producer

Radio journalist Trey Kay is host and producer of "Us & Them," a podcast devoted to telling stories from all sides of the Culture Wars. He co-produces the podcast with West Virginia Public Broadcasting.

Kay also produced the 2009 radio documentary The Great Textbook War, which was honored with a George Foster Peabody Award, a national Edward R. Murrow Award, and a duPont-Columbia Silver Baton. He also collaborated on a traveling exhibit called Books and Beliefs, a companion piece for documentary. In 2005, Kay shared in another Peabody for his contribution to Studio 360’s “American Icons: Moby Dick” program.

His work has been recognized with two New York Festivals Awards: “I’m Not A Doctor, But I Play One At The Holiday Inn” (This American Life) and “A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood: A Musical Journey in the Life of Martin Luther King, Jr.” (WNYC and NPR). He has been an associate producer for “News Wars: Secrets, Sources and Spin,” a two-hour report for PBS Frontline. Kay produced segments for Marketplace, Weekend America, Day to Day, Morning Edition, and The Next Big Thing.

 

Person Page
  • The battle of Blair Mountain in 1921 might be West Virginia's ultimate ‘us and them’ story — labor versus absentee landowners; working class versus ruling class; West Virginia versus the world.
  • This Us & Them episode, which was recently honored with a 2012 National Edward R. Murrow award, examines: How can society support grandparents who are raising the children of their drug-addicted children?
  • As summer draws to a close and students head back to the classroom, Us & Them host Trey Kay harkens back to a time when we weren’t thinking about masks or social distancing, the possibility of infection or the sadness of isolation and lack of connection. Back then, Trey recalls kids at his West Virginia high school sorting themselves into different camps. How one dressed was often a determining factor…right down to the shoes.
  • The fight for sobriety comes in many forms. For some, abstinence works. For others, it takes medication to kick addiction. But that creates its own battle.
  • Back in 1968, a West Virginia band did something brave. It wasn't the easy thing to do, but it put them on the right side of history. For this episode, host Trey Kay learns about an act of defiance against racial discrimination that happened 50 years ago in a Charleston night club and the consequences for four musicians.
  • Since 2010, West Virginia has lost nearly 50,000 residents. From 2010 to 2018, it was one of only two states with more deaths than births. That generational imbalance is expected to grow even wider in the coming years. Is the state prepared to care for a growing number of Golden Mountaineers in their sunset years?
  • Dental care isn’t just about a pretty smile. The state of our teeth plays an important role in our overall health. In West Virginia, dental hygiene is a challenge for many people. Accessible and affordable dental care can be hard to find.
  • There's a name for young people, who aren't in school, or working, or training for work. They are disconnected youth. West Virginia has one of the highest rates of these young people — between the age of 16 and 24 — who feel stuck in the transition between school and joining the workforce.
  • Us & Them host Trey Kay asks students from his alma mater George Washington High School in Charleston, West Virginia, if they can envision their future in their home state. He also speaks with West Virginia native and former Intuit CEO Brad Smith who’s trying to transform the Mountain State into the “Start-up State.”
  • After a year of extraordinary social, racial, political and economic upheaval, some people say they’ve lost trust in one another, our institutions and our government. What do we risk if we’re unwilling to trust in our fellow Americans?For this episode, host Trey Kay speaks to several Americans, whose sense of distrust prevents them from believing politicians, government agencies, the justice system, the news media and their fellow Americans. He also speaks with social psychologists Dominic Packer and Jay Van Bavel, authors of the soon to be published book called “The Power of Us.” In it, they explore how the groups we belong to shape our identity and reality.