Russell Lewis

The U.S. women's soccer team is still the world's best after dominating the Netherlands in the Women's World Cup final and winning 2-0. Throughout the tournament, the U.S. brushed aside criticism, complaints of arrogance and calls for the team to tone down their goal celebrations. All the team did was win. All seven World Cup games, in fact.

It was the battle of unbeatens at this Women's World Cup. Both teams were 5-0. The U.S. — the defending and three-time World Cup champion — and England — which was ranked third in the world but had never advanced past the semifinals. The game in Lyon, France, lived up to its billing with the U.S defeating England 2-1 to advance to Sunday's final.

Pick your superlative and chances are someone, somewhere used it to describe this game at some point. Epic. Intense. Pressure-packed. Match of the tournament. Regardless of the term, the Women's World Cup quarterfinal game lived up to the hype. One versus four. Defending champion against the host country favorite. The U.S. was crisp and powerful from the first whistle until the final one. It beat France 2-1.

The U.S. has shown few weaknesses in its march through the Women's World Cup in France. But now the competition gets harder and the stakes are higher in the knockout round of the monthlong tournament. The first U.S. test comes Monday against Spain in the round of 16 (kickoff is noon ET and broadcast on FS1 and Telemundo).

The United States Women's National Team continued to show why it's the best team in the world with another stellar performance in the Women's World Cup. The U.S. defeated Chile 3-0 before a sell-out crowd in Paris.

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When a passenger jet crashed in Indonesia last year, Dennis Muilenburg said what airline executives commonly say.

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DENNIS MUILENBURG: The bottom line here is the 737 Max is safe.

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What went wrong in the crash of a Boeing 737 Max plane in Ethiopia that killed all 157 people on board? We have some answers this morning.

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We're going to turn now to NPR's Russell Lewis to bring us up to date on this story.

And, Russell, what more have you learned about the ongoing investigations?

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The top-ranked U.S. Women's National Soccer Team is back on the field Saturday afternoon playing against number four England in Nashville, Tenn. The SheBelieves Cup also includes top-ten powerhouses Brazil and Japan. The U.S. and Japan played to a 2-2 tie on Wednesday.

When Nancy Grace Roman was a child, her favorite object to draw was the moon.

Her mother used to take her on walks under the nighttime sky and show her constellations, or point out the colorful swirls of the aurora. Roman loved to look up at the stars and imagine.

Eventually, her passion for stargazing blossomed into a career as a renowned astronomer. Roman was one of the first female executives at NASA, where she served as the agency's first chief of astronomy.

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All this year, we've been taking a look back at the events of 1968. It was a remarkable time in this country's history. It included raging protests, political assassinations and racial strife. But on this day, 50 years ago, Apollo 8 lifted off.

Alan Bean, the fourth man to walk on the moon who later chronicled the experience as an artist, died Saturday in Houston after a short illness. He was 86.

Bean was the lunar module pilot of Apollo 12, which made the second moon landing, in 1969.

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There was a beautiful moment at the Olympics last night that might have gone unnoticed. Two U.S. athletes won medals for the first time. But that is not the story, as NPR's Russell Lewis reports from Pyeongchang.

John Young, who was one of NASA's most experienced astronauts and the first to fly in space six times, including a moon landing, died on Friday after complications from pneumonia. He was 87.

In NASA's history, few astronauts were more accomplished than John Young. His career was filled with firsts: he was the first to fly in space six times. He was on the first Gemini mission and he commanded the first shuttle flight. (He was also one of 12 people to walk on the moon.)

NASA astronaut Bruce McCandless has died at the age of 80, NASA announced Friday. You may not know his name, but you most likely have seen him in one of the most famous pictures ever taken in space. In 1984, McCandless strapped on a jet-powered backpack and flew away from the shuttle, by himself, untethered, with Earth as a backdrop. It was the first time an astronaut had ever floated freely in space; McCandless had helped develop the technology.

Astronaut Dick Gordon who flew to the moon but never got a chance to walk on the surface has died at his California home at age 88, according to NASA.

NASA Administrator Robert Lightfoot said, "Dick will be fondly remembered as one of our nation's boldest flyers, a man who added to our own nation's capabilities by challenging his own. He will be missed."

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