Dave Mistich

Senior Reporter

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Mountain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He has also served as an Innovator in Residence for West Virginia University's Reed College of Media, where he helped an experimental journalism course investigate water quality using sensors and data reporting.

Ways to Connect

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

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The House of Delegates voted Monday to impeach all four remaining justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. Eleven articles of impeachment have been adopted over the course of proceedings that have strectched more than 14 hours.

West Virginia Judiciary

Updated: August 10, 2018 at 12:10 p.m.

 

A Cabell County circuit judge has been appointed to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals during the suspension of Justice Allen Loughry. The appointment comes as four justices on the state’s high court may be impeached.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and will be updated. Please refresh this page for the latest. Updated: August 7, 2018 at 6:15 p.m.

 

The House Judiciary Committee has adopted articles of impeachment against the entire bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. The articles were introduced Tuesday morning after more than a month of testimony and presentation of evidence.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Updated: August 6, 2018 at 6:40 p.m.

 

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice said money his coal companies owe in West Virginia has been paid. At a Monday news conference, West Virginia revenue officials said the obligations from Justice’s companies had been paid, including fines and taxes.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the House Judiciary Committee and a pool of news media got a first-hand look Monday at the offices of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. The tour was part of evidence in the ongoing investigation into the possible impeachment of one or more justices on the bench of the state’s high court.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee have proposed articles of impeachment against embattled West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry. They say they have heard enough evidence to impeach Loughry and point to a deadline that would force a special election in November to fill the remainder of his term.

Bob Bird / AP Photo

Updated: Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 1:14 p.m.

A former West Virginia Supreme Court Justice has agreed to plead guilty to charges of fraud and is cooperating with prosecutors. The plea agreement comes as the high court’s bench is under scrutiny for the private use of state resources.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Delegates on the House Judiciary Committee heard more detail Friday about renovations to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and other spending by the court.

Justin Robinson of the Legislative Post Audits Division outlined the court’s spending for the committee, which -- since 2010 -- includes more than $1.5 million for renovations to the justices’ offices.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: July 26, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. For more information on the potentional impeachments, see this explainer.

Lawmakers on the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony Thursday from former West Virginia Supreme Court administrator Steve Canterbury. It’s part of an ongoing impeachment investigation of one or more justices on state’s high court.

 

Steve Helber / AP Photo

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Former Massey Energy CEO and failed GOP candidate Don Blankenship has been denied ballot access as a candidate for the Constitution Party in the race for U.S. Senate. The rejection all but ensures a court battle between Blankenship and the Secretary of State over West Virginia’s so-called “sore loser” election law.

Allen Loughry
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the possible impeachments, see this explainer

 

A committee investigating possible impeachment of one or more justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals will return to Charleston for a third round of hearing evidence and testimony. The proceedings come as one justice pleaded not guilty Wednesday to additional federal charges.

Molly Born / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated: Tuesday, July 24, 2018 at 5:05 p.m.

Former Massey Energy CEO Don Blankenship has again filed paperwork with the West Virginia Secretary of State’s Office to run for U.S. Senate -- this time on a third-party’s ticket. His new bid for office -- filed Tuesday, July 24, with the Secretary of State’s office -- is a challenge to the state’s so-called “sore loser” law.

Candidates in the race from the two major parties expressed differing views on Blankenship’s potential challenge to the state’s election laws.

Tyler Evert / AP Photo

A former coal executive who spent a year in prison is set to challenge West Virginia’s “sore loser” election law by running for U.S. Senate as a member of the Constitution Party following a failed bid for the Republican Party nomination.

In a statement issued Monday, Don Blankenship’s campaign representatives already said they do not expect the filing to be certified and will challenge the anticipated denial.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: July 23, 2018 at 5:55 p.m.

 

A committee of West Virginia lawmakers investigating the possible impeachment of one or more state Supreme Court and an administrator for the court are continuing to negotiate the terms of a tour of the high court’s offices. The negotiations follow concerns last week over press freedoms and open meetings laws -- as the committee agreed to delay the orginally scheduled tour.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A tour of Supreme Court offices has been delayed following concerns about press freedom and potential violations of West Virginia’s open meetings laws as some state delegates push for court transparency. Members of the House Judiciary Committee also agreed to make their tour of the court conditional upon media access being granted to three pool reporters from the press corps covering potential impeachment proceedings of one or more state Supreme Court justices.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the potential Supreme Court impeachments, see this explainer.

West Virginia lawmakers have resumed hearings on the possible impeachment of one or more state Supreme Court justices. Members of the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony Thursday from four current employees of the court -- focused mainly on suspended Justice Allen Loughry.

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

A federal prosecutor in West Virginia has tacked on an additional charge against a state Supreme Court Justice who was indicted last month on charges of fraud, witness tampering and making false statements.

U.S. Attorney for the Southern Distict of West Virginia Mike Stuart announced that a superseding indictment against West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry was unsealed Tuesday, adding the charge of obstruction of justice to 22 other counts that have been mounted against the embattled judg

Alexander Zemlianichenko / AP Photo

A day after President Donald Trump’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki, most of West Virginia’s congressional delegation has weighed in on what many critics saw as a lost opportunity to condemn the foreign leader for his country’s role in interfering with the United States' 2016 election.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the potential Supreme Court impeachments, see this explainer.

The House Judiciary Committee continued its meetings Friday on the possible impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court justices. The second day of testimony focused heavily on suspended Justice Allen Loughry and his private use of state resources. The justices also delivered a letter to the committee critizing the impeachment proceedings.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For additional information on the potential impeachments, see this explainer.

The House Judiciary Committee have begun to examine evidence in the possible impeachment of one or more state Supreme Court justices. Members heard testimony from auditors on the improper use of state vehicles and rental cars, a justice’s possession of a historic desk and a fast spend-down of a budget surplus. The opening proceedings were also marked by a partisan battle over the committee's newly established rules of procedure.

Bob Bird / AP Photo

Updated: July 11, 2018 at 4:44 p.m.

Just one day ahead of scheduled meetings on potential impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court justices, Justice Menis Ketchum has resigned.

Josh Saul / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A committee of West Virginia lawmakers will meet again this week to hear more about a slow-moving flood recovery program. The Joint Legislative Committee on Flooding will hold a meeting Thursday with the Legislature’s Joint Committee on Government and Finance.

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

As lawmakers discuss the possible impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court Justices, the rarity of the process raises questions about procedure, its history and other potential constitutional issues.

On Tuesday, June 26, West Virginia delegates passed House Resolution 201, stating: “Some or all of the five members of the Court may be guilty of maladministration, corruption, incompetency, gross immorality, or high crimes or misdemeanors, and may be unfit to serve as Chief Justice or as Justices of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.”

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee has announced additional meetings to continue the impeachment process of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court justices.

House Judiciary Committee chairman John Shott has announced the additional meetings, which will take place Thursday, July 12 through Saturday, July 14.

Chris Jackson / AP Photo

President Donald Trump delivered remarks to a dinner crowd Tuesday in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, just ahead of the Fourth of July holiday and a golf tournament at a resort owned by Gov. Jim Justice.

Evan Vucci / AP Photo

President Donald Trump will be in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia for a dinner honoring active-service military personnel and veterans. The dinner, dubbed a "Salute to Service" is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Tuesday at The Greenbrier.

Trump’s fifth visit to the state as president comes just ahead of the Fourth of July holiday and a PGA golf tournament hosted at the resort owned by Gov. Jim Justice. The tournament, once known as The Greenbrier Classic, was recently renamed A Military Tribute at the Greenbrier.

With school out, a lot of teachers are thinking about a wave of protests that had them walking off the job, demanding things like better pay and benefits and more funding for public education.

Some of those educators are now running for public office and are on the ballot in North Carolina, Kentucky, Oklahoma, Arizona, Colorado and in West Virginia where those strikes began. Still, others wonder if what has been seen as a movement created by public school teachers can translate to wins for seats in statehouses across the country.

Flickr / davidwilson1949

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Gov. Jim Justice has issued a special session call for the West Virginia Legislature to consider matters related to the removal of one or more Justices of the state’s Supreme Court of Appeals. The special session will begin Tuesday at noon.

W.Va. Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry.
W.Va. Supreme Court of Appeals

Updated: Friday, June 22, 2018 at 6:00 p.m.

Hours after a West Virginia Supreme Court justice pleaded not guilty in federal court, top legislators have asked committee chairmen to consider beginning impeachment proceedings against the embroiled justice and others. 

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A member of the West Virginia House of Delegates has filed suit against Gov. Jim Justice over a provision in the state constitution requiring the governor to reside in the state capital.

Del. Isaac Sponaugle, a Democrat, filed a complaint in Kanawha County Circuit Court stating that Gov. Justice has not lived in Charleston or conducted the business of his office in the state’s capital.

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