Dave Mistich

Senior Reporter

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Mountain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He has also served as an Innovator in Residence for West Virginia University's Reed College of Media, where he helped an experimental journalism course investigate water quality using sensors and data reporting.

Ways to Connect

Governor Earl Ray Tomblin has issued a state of emergency and West Virginia American Water is telling more than 100,000 customers (about 300,000 people) in Boone, Cabell, Clay, Jackson, Kanawha, Lincoln, Logan, Putnam, and Roane counties NOT to ingest, cook, bathe, wash or boil water.  Water in this coverage area is okayed ONLY for flushing and fire protection.

Jessica Wintz / Facebook

Gov. Earl Ray Tomblin  delivered the 2014 State of the State Address Wednesday night in the House Chamber at the State Capitol.  

      Gov. Tomblin’s remarks, as prepared for delivery, are included below:

 

"Mr. Speaker, Mr. President, Members of the Legislature, Members of the Board of Public Works, Justices of the Supreme Court of Appeals, Members of the State Board of Education, distinguished guests, and my fellow West Virginians.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A statewide organization focused on issues related to child poverty presented their 11-point platform to legislators before the 60-day session opens Wednesday, Republicans in the House of Delegates want lower taxes and less regulation, community members in Lochgelly, West Virginia express concerns over a proposed waste-pit-turned-injection-well, and our friends at The Allegheny Front talk about a new initiative in Pennsylvania that brings together watershed advocates, regulators, and a mining company to clean up an orange stream.

Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

Mountain Stage's 30th anniversary season was certainly one for the books. While some might think this year's stellar roster of artists is extraordinary in some sense, the truth of the matter is that the impressive list of musicians that Larry Groce and the Mountain Stage crew put together sticks pretty closely to what the show has been targeting since its inception.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Lawrence Messina of the West Virginia Department of Military Affairs and Public Safety joins Beth Vorhees by phone to discuss the extreme cold and what's being done to keep residents safe, could fracking solve abandoned mine water problems, and West Virginia University's basketball teams begin their second year in the Big 12.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Berkeley County 5th grade teacher Erin Sponaugle is West Virginia's Teacher of the Year and a new book highlights the history of the state's county courthouses.

Roscoe Bartlett, U.S. Representative for Maryland's 6th congressional district from 1993 to 2013, is going "off the grid" in the mountains of West Virginia. By building his own home powered by solar energy, and attempting to live off resources collected himself, Bartlett says his mission is to be “independent of the system.”

I'm sad to report that this sixth 'Songs From the Doc' post marks the penultimate in the series that documents the music used in 'Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective'. It's been a lot of fun putting these posts together and being able to share the music that's help shape the history and identity of the show.

In case you haven't been tuning in (or, "logging on", rather) to the 'Songs From the Doc' series, the music presented in these posts is pulled from an hour-long radio documentary I produced for the 30 year anniversary of our live performance radio show, Mountain Stage. 

Ask anyone who has worked on Mountain Stage or has been to the show more than a few times and they'll tell you picking a favorite show or act would be like asking someone to choose their favorite child. There's simply been too much incredible music to whittle it down to just one or two favorites.

Vasilia Scouras / Mountain Stage

Lyle Lovett - "Cowboy Man"

One of the most impressive things about Mountain Stage's roster of guests isn't just who has played the show but when they did so.  Acts like Alison Krauss, Ani DiFranco, Norah Jones, Counting Crows, and Phish performed on Mountain Stage before they were widely known across America and the world. While this practice of introducing audiences to emerging talent is par for the Mountain Stage course these days, it took awhile for the show to stabilize itself and be able to develop this side of its identity. One of the first acts the show introduced the rest of world to was country crooner Lyle Lovett in May 1987.

First off, Merry Christmas!

Hello again and welcome back (presuming, of course, you stopped by for the first installment in this series a few days ago)! While Monday's post is a nice run-down of the earliest moments of Mountain Stage, from here on out you can expect some incredible performances from a wide range of artists included in 'Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective'.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A look at Christmas for juvenile delinquents at the Rubenstein Center in Tucker County, what Christmas was like 150 years ago in Harpers Ferry, and our friends at Traveling 219 look back at a panther sighting in Marlinton on Christmas Eve 1955.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A deeper analysis of 'Who Owns West Virginia?', a family-owned "choose-and-cut" Christmas tree farm in Mercer County, a popular live Christmas tree known as the Canaan Fir struggles in the wild, and Christmas ornaments made by the students at the Schools for the Deaf and Blind.

These Mountain Stage performances from the 1980s will be digitized as part of the Digital Archive Project.
Josh Saul / Mountain Stage

Probably--well, not probably, most definitely--the most fun part of producing a documentary on 30 years of Mountain Stage is getting to cull through the archives of 2,000 hours of live performance radio. It's daunting, humbling, and exciting all in one. There's music recorded on virtually every format: reel to reel, DAT, miniDisc--you name it--they've got it on that medium.

U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

The unemployment rate fell in 41 of West Virginia's 55 counties in November.
 
     WorkForce West Virginia said Friday that unemployment rose in 13 counties and was unchanged in one.
 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A look back to New Year’s Eve 1973 years ago and the murder of mine union presidential candidate Joseph “Jock” Yablonski, the Cacapon and Lost River Land Trust obtains an easement on property along the Morgan Hampshire County line, the Marshall Thundering Herd gets set to square off against the Maryland Terrapins in the Military Bowl, and Robert Earl Keen performs "Who Do Man" on this Mountain Stage song of the week.

Be it congratulatory or just passive friendliness, hand shakes, high fives, and fist bumps are common in our culture. But which is safest from a public health perspective? Here's what one Morgantown plastic surgeon has to say about the matter.

Joseph Adams / wikimedia Commons

Jefferson County commissioners are considering banning large music festivals in the county.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Farmers and officials at the State Department of Health and Human Resources have different opinions on the value of raw milk and Morgantown actor Bobby Wolfe hit big with a role in the film Out of the Furnace, starring Hollywood heavyweights Christian Bale, Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck and Forrest Whitaker.

West Virginia Lottery Director John Musgrave announced today that a lottery ticket for Tuesday, December 17's Mega Millions drawing that is worth $1 million was sold at the 7-Eleven in Belle.
 

Phil Duncan, Snowshoe Mountain

Here's a quick peek at what it looked like on the slopes at Snowshoe Mountain Resort Wednesday morning.

Resort officials say the area received five inches of snow overnight Tuesday, which created prime conditions for skiing, snowboarding and snow tubing during the first week of the 2013 Holiday period.

Nine efficiency style apartments in the Vanity Fair space at the Cabell-Huntington Coalition for the Homeless receive heating and air conditioning units, Morgan County writer Jeanne Mozier stays busy with two projects--a release of her travel guide 'Way Out in West Virginia'  and a fictionalize account of a Senate campaign more than 20 years ago, and storyteller Karen Vuranch shares a favorite Christmas time story.

The Reconnecting McDowell board of directors approved a plan today to purchase property in downtown Welch, W.Va., on which to build much-needed, affordable housing for teachers and other professionals.

The Energy Corporation of America considers building a class two injection well in Preston County near Deckers Creek, The Countess of Carnarvon talks about her new book and the real Downton Abbey in anticipation of the premiere of the show's fourth season, and the Womack brothers discuss West Virginia Music Hall of Fame gospel-rock inductees, The Swan Silvertones.

The National Park Service will be closing the Ajax Spring located off of Fayette Station Road after recent mandatory testing indicated the water does not meet the minimum requirements for drinking water.  Despite the fact that the spring is posted as a non-potable water source, there are concerns that residents in the local community use the spring water for household use. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia University Chief Diversity Officer David Fryson remembers Charleston social activist Leon Sullivan, WVU begins a partnership with a University in China to promote exchanges in language, culture and business,  and Beckley actress, playwright, and historian Karen Vuranch reads "Christmas in the Appalachian Mountains" by Richard Madison.

Anna Kucsma

Wintry weather is expected to bring snow and possibly sleet over the course of the weekend, according to advisories posted by the National Weather Service and their outposts around the region.

Their Charleston office has issued a Winter Weather Advisory for Randolph and Pocahontas counties from Saturday, December 14 at 4 a.m. to Sunday, December 15 at 1 a.m.

* HAZARD TYPES...ACCUMULATING SNOW AT THE ONSET...CHANGING TO
  FREEZING RAIN.

Brian Blauser

Before a newly formed legislative committee begins to meet, Speaker of the House Tim Miley and a group of legislators plan a tour around the state to learn from small business owners and entrepreneurs, members of the Cabell County Board of Education tour the new Huntington East Middle School before it opens in January, Book Lovers of Charleston celebrate 90 years, and The Steep Canyon Rangers perform "Tell The Ones I Love" on this Mountain Stage song of the week.

@chrismmmccomas / Twitter

  Marshall University graduate and systems integration analyst Chris McComas wants to become the next head coach of the North Dakota Fighting Sioux football team. The way he went about applying for the job is genius.

He began his pursuit for the position by emailing Brian Faison, the athletic director of the university. In that email McComas attached a hilarious Powerpoint presentation detailing his coaching philosophy that wasn't short of brazen confidence.

Sports websites like Deadspin began picking up the story.

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