Dave Mistich

Senior Reporter

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Mountain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He has also served as an Innovator in Residence for West Virginia University's Reed College of Media, where he helped an experimental journalism course investigate water quality using sensors and data reporting.

Ways to Connect

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2020 at 6:05 p.m.

A controversial and sweeping tax reform overhaul met its demise Tuesday in the West Virginia Senate when the second — and most essential — part of a two-pronged plan to wipe out tangible personal property taxes was rejected. While the Republican-led chamber had already passed the details of the proposal, they failed to pull enough votes to allow it to have a chance at becoming constitutional.

Will Price / West Virginia Le

A two-pronged tax overhaul got halfway completed Monday in the West Virginia Senate. The sweeping proposal — which includes a repeal of hundreds of millions of dollars in personal property taxes on manufacturing, motor vehicles and other personal property, as well as hikes on tobacco and sales taxes — is the combination of a bill and a proposed constitutional amendment that allows for all of the proposed changes to take effect.

Rich Pedroncelli / AP Photo

Members of the West Virginia Senate have voted to provide free feminine hygiene products to inmates of the state’s prisons and jails. 

Senate Bill 484 would have the superintendent of a state correctional facility to provide inmates their choice of tampons or sanitary napkins within eight hours of a request.

Greyhound dogs sprint around a turn during a race at the Palm Beach Kennel Club, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Oct. 4, 2018.
Brynn Anderson / AP Photo

The West Virginia Senate has rejected a measure that would have eliminated a fund that helps prop up the state’s greyhound racing industry.

Medical Marijuana
John Locher / AP Photo

Lawmakers took a major step in 2017 toward legalizing cannabis use in West Virginia when they passed a bill that created a medical program. But nearly three years later, the program still isn’t operational — and many say it’s still more than a year away from launching. 

This session, lawmakers continue to offer some major tweaks to the as-of-yet-launched program. Those proposals – which are included in multiple bills – could change which forms would be considered medically acceptable.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate’s Finance Committee unveiled Monday a complicated and sweeping set of tax reforms. The proposed refiguration of the state’s tax code is somewhat of a game of musical chairs — with a few significant hurdles to overcome. 

Lawmakers in the GOP-led Senate are continuing their push to roll back the manufacturing machinery, equipment and inventory tax  but, with a committee originating bill, they’re also tacking on a proposal that would eliminate taxes on retail inventory and automobiles. 

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated Thursday, Feb. 13, 2020 at 4:05 p.m.

A mobile voting application used in West Virginia’s 2018 election cycle is susceptible to various vulnerabilities, according to a study released Thursday by researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. But the company behind the technology is disputing the findings and recommendations of the study.

In this Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2016 photo, West Virginia Gov. -elect Jim Justice talks to his team during halftime of a girls high school basketball game in Lewisburg, W.Va.
Steve Helber / AP Photo

Updated Wednesday, Feb. 12, 2020 at 4:15 p.m.

Gov. Jim Justice is defending his use of the word “thugs” to describe players and coaches of a high school girls basketball team. The governor — who coaches the girls team at Greenbrier East High School — used the phrase to describe the behavior of an opposing team and their coaches during a Tuesday night game. With lawmakers in session, Justice’s words were also the topic of conversation Wednesday on the House of Delegates floor.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate passed a bill Tuesday that would allow private and homeschool students to play public school sports and participate in other extracurricular activities. Senate Bill 131, known as the Tim Tebow Act, is named after the Heisman trophy winner and professional athlete who fought as a homeschooler for the right to play public school sports.

Courtesty Morgantown Police Department Twitter

Updated Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020 at 11:50 a.m.

Two West Virginia University students aboard a Personal Rapid Transit, or PRT car, and the driver of a vehicle were transported to a Ruby Memorial Hospital in Morgantown Monday afternoon after a rock slide sent a small boulder careening onto U.S. 19 / Monongahela Boulevard. One woman, whose vehicle was struck by a boulder, is listed in critical condition.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Those protesting pipelines and other industrial sites could be subject to fines and imprisonment under a new bill being considered in the West Virginia House of Delegates. The lower chamber’s Judiciary Committee held a public hearing Monday on a measure known as the West Virginia Critical Infrastructure Protection Act.

House Bill 4615 would designate and protect facilities the measure deems “critical infrastructure facilities” — including oil refineries, natural gas operations, telecommunications infrastructure, railroads, chemical plants, government-regulated dams and water treatment facilities. The measure would impose various jail sentences and fines for trespassing, vandalism and “conspiring” with those who carry out those acts. 

West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill to create an intermediate court of appeals in West Virginia is on its way to a final vote in the state Senate. Lawmakers rejected an amendment Friday that would have required the proposed court to handle criminal cases in addition to civil cases.

Senate Bill 275 would create another layer of appeals between circuit courts and the state Supreme Court. Two three-judge panels — split between a northern and southern district — would hear civil cases, guardianship cases and workers’ compensation cases, as well as appeals to decisions in family court.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate’s Select Committee on Children and Families has advanced a bill that would create a string of reforms for employees of the Department of Health and Human Resources’ Bureau for Children and Families. Senate Bill 312 would focus on pay, create a registration system for caseworkers and hopes to address issues of vacancies and turnover that have plagued the bureau.

Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., speaks with reporters after President Donald Trump was acquitted in an impeachment trial on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020.
Patrick Semansky / AP Photo

West Virginia U.S. Sen. Joe Manchin, often seen as one of the most moderate and Trump-friendly Democrats in the Senate, voted Wednesday along party lines to convict President Donald Trump on both Articles of Impeachment. 

While the 67-vote threshold for convicting the president was viewed as nearly insurmountable with Republicans holding a 53 seat majority in the Senate, Manchin remained undecided about how he would vote until Wednesday. 

Sen. Mike Romano, D-Harrison, speaks against Senate Joint Resolution 7 on Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020.
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

More than a year after a temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court derailed the 2018 impeachment trials of justices of the state’s high court, Republican leaders of the Legislature still have work ahead of themselves to undo the decision they see as unjust. A Wednesday vote indicates that lingering partisan sentiments continue to surround the impeachments.

Brian Stansberry / creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

The town of Athens, in Mercer County, West Virginia has become the thirteenth municipality in the state to adopt a non-discrimination ordinace to protect employment and housing rights based on sexual orientation orientation or gender identity. 

Members of the town council voted unanimously Tuesday night to approve the measure. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate Education Committee has approved a bill that would allow homeschool and private school students to participate in public school extracurricular activities under the state’s Secondary School Activities Commission. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill that would create another layer for West Virginia’s judicial system in civil cases is now headed to the Senate floor for consideration. 

Senate Bill 275 cleared the upper chamber’s Finance Committee Tuesday. 

Senate Television / via AP

U.S. Senator Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., is proposing a resolution that would censure President Donald Trump over the president’s actions toward Ukraine. Manchin, who is often recognized as having a friendly relationship with the president, has been seen as a key vote in the Senate’s impeachment trial. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill known as the Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act has cleared a first committee in the West Virginia Senate after passing the House of Delegates earlier this session. The Senate Health and Human Resources Committee cleared House Bill 4007 Thursday on a 11-1 roll call vote. 

Sen. Corey Palumbo, a Democrat from Kanawha County who is not running for re-election this year, was the only member of the health committee to vote no. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate is working to undo a decision by a temporary bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals that effectively prevents justices of the state’s high court from being impeached and standing trial. 

Members of the upper chamber’s Judiciary Committee advanced a joint resolution — a potential constitutional amendment — that would remedy the 2018 impeachments that ultimately fizzled out.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice / Youtube

With the help of the son of a famous televangelist, Gov. Jim Justice plugged a proposal for counties in Virginia to join West Virginia. The pitch for secession is part of an ongoing effort in the West Virginia Legislature now dubbed “Vexit.”

Jerry Falwell, Jr. is a lawyer, Baptist, president of Liberty University and the son of televangelist Jerry Fallwell, Sr. He joined Gov. Jim Justice in Martinsburg Tuesday to announce their shared support of counties leaving Virginia for West Virginia. The two touted Gov. Justice’s ties to President Trump.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate Judiciary Committee has approved a bill that would create an intermediate appellate court system. But amendments to the proposal Monday changed the way judges would take seats on the proposed bench — now calling for nonpartisan elections rather than gubernatorial appointments. 

Senate Bill 275, which committee members began work on Friday, has appeared in recent legislative sessions but has failed to make its way to the governor’s desk. 

Del. Mike Caputo speaks on the House floor.
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Misdemeanor battery charges against Del. Mike Caputo, D-Marion, for an incident that happened toward the end of the last legislative session were dismissed on Monday, Jan. 27. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Would a gathering of delegates from each of the fifty states, tasked with amending the United States Constitution, be focused on a singular topic? Or would such a convention turn into a free-for-all — leaving the country’s supreme legal document susceptible to reckless changes?

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The introduction of a proposed state constitutional amendment that would repeal a tax on manufacturing equipment and Inventory sparked conversation Tuesday in the West Virginia Senate. 

Senate Joint Resolution 8, titled the “Manufacturing Growth Amendment,” was introduced Tuesday in the Senate. Such an effort has become a perennial issue in recent years — and offered in various forms — under the GOP-controlled legislature, but has yet to clear both chambers. 

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate passed a bill that protects victims of sexual assault and rape from being required to submit to certain physical exams. Senate Bill 125 cleared the upper chamber Tuesday on a 33-0 vote.

The measure would prevent a court from ordering a victim of sexual assault from submitting to a medical examination evaluating the reported assault. Additionally, a victim’s refusal to submit to such examinations could also not be used as a basis to exclude evidence gathered from other relevant examinations of the victim.

A marijuana plant grows at Fotmer SA, an enterprise that produces cannabis for medical use, in Montevideo, Uruguay, Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019.
Matilde Campodonico / AP Photo

Democrats in the West Virginia House of Delegates are asking the state Department of Commerce to fast-track a study on adult use of recreational cannabis.

State Department of Commerce Secretary Ed Gaunch told the House Small Business, Entrepreneurship and Economic Development Committee Wednesday he would consider studying the economic impact of adult use of recreational cannabis. 

Patricia Rucker
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A controversial proposal that failed in the GOP-led West Virginia Legislature’s education overhaul last year has been reintroduced in the state senate. 

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia House of Delegates has passed a bill that would penalize physicians who don't provide medical care to a fetus that survives an unsuccessful abortion. Minority Democrats called the measure an election year political stunt that accomplishes nothing, but many voted for the measure anyway.

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