Dave Mistich

Senior Reporter

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Mountain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He has also served as an Innovator in Residence for West Virginia University's Reed College of Media, where he helped an experimental journalism course investigate water quality using sensors and data reporting.

Ways to Connect

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated Wednesday, February 27, 2019 at 4:30 p.m.

A bill that would allow for concealed weapons on college campuses in West Virginia is now back into play, with the House Rules Committee reversing course on whether the measure would be placed on the chamber’s active calendar.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Senate has cleared a bill that would make changes to the state’s campaign finance laws. While the measure increases the limits on donations to candidates and other political groups, opponents say the bill fails to provide transparency on so-called dark money in elections.

Robinson, Ellington
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

With a legislative deadline looming for Wednesday, the House of Delegates moved Monday to bring bills held up in committee onto the floor. Some of those motions were successful, but one bill -- which has been notable throughout the session -- failed to move forward.

Wednesday is Crossover Day, a deadline for bills to have passed their chamber of origin. With that in mind, delegates offered motions to forego committee references and advance bills that have been caught up in committee.

The West Virginia House of Delegates has passed a bill calling for pay raises for teachers, school service personnel and state police. The increases would be the second in two years for public employees whose salaries are set in state code.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia teachers and school employees will be back on the job Thursday after a deadline passed for a controversial education reform bill to be revived. Leaders of teacher and school service personnel unions made the announcement following a Wednesday evening floor session in the House of Delegates.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 6:05 p.m. 

With the omnibus education bill effectively dead, the House of Delegates has turned its attention to providing pay raises for state employees, including teachers, service personnel and state police. The lower chamber’s Finance Committee cleared a bill Wednesday that would do just that.

John Raby / AP Photo

Despite the West Virginia House of Delegates effectively killing a long, sweeping and controversial education reform package, teachers and school employees will be off the job for a second day Wednesday.

Leaders of teacher and service personnel unions cited the slightest of chances that Senate Bill 451 could be revived through a House motion to reconsider action on the measure. On Tuesday, the House adopted a motion to postpone the measure indefinitely, effectively killing the bill on a 53-45 vote.

Del. Mike Caputo speaks on the House floor.
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Editor's Note: A previous headline on this story said the House killed the education omnibus education bill. While the vote today makes it difficult for the bill to survive, there are still some technical maneuvers that could bring the bill back to the floor. This story will be updated when the situation becomes clearer.

The West Virginia House of Delegates has effectively killed a controversial education reform measure that has forced the second teacher strike in as many years.

The leaders of West Virginia teacher and service personnel unions announce a statewide strike Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 outside the Senate chambers at the Capitol.
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated February 18, 2019 at 7:27 p.m.

Leaders of West Virginia teacher and school service personnel unions have announced a statewide strike will begin Tuesday. That announcement came at a Monday news conference as the upper chamber was set to adopt an amendment to the House of Delegates’ version of Senate Bill 451.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated on Monday, Feb. 18, 2019 at 7:58 p.m.

The West Virginia Legislature continued a back and forth Monday on a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. The upper chamber adopted an amendment to the House of Delegate's version Senate Bill 451, which makes some notable changes to the measure.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated on Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019 at 6:54 p.m.

The West Virginia House of Delegates has passed its version of a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. The proposal, which calls for teacher and school service pay raises, but also other ideas opposed by public educators such as charter schools, is a stripped-down version of the measure the Senate passed last week.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Thursday, Feb. 14, 2019 at 4:00 a.m.

 

The West Virginia House of Delegates finished their opportunity to tailor a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill after more than 10 hours of debate Wednesday. With Senate Bill 451 on the floor amendment stage, delegates voted on 31 amendments to a strike-and-insert version of the measure -- adopting 10 and rejecting 21.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The full West Virginia House of Delegates is set to consider a controversial education reform bill. The measure, which has taken a winding path since passing in the Senate last week, has made its way through two House committees and will be on the floor amendment stage Wednesday.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Public school teachers, administrators, parents and representatives of special interest groups gathered in the West Virginia House of Delegates chamber Monday morning to give their take on a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. It was the first of two public hearings on the issue.

 

Porterfield
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Monday, Feb. 11, 2019 at 9:00 p.m.

The leader of West Virginia Republican party has denounced derogatory comments a state delegate made against members of the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual and queer communities. That response comes as Democrats have called for the lawmaker's resignation and have continued to push for added protected classes in the state's Human Rights Act.

John Raby / AP Photo

Leaders of educator and service personnel unions in West Virginia have the greenlight to call a work action if and when they deem it necessary. The decision comes as the Legislature considers a long, sweeping and controversial education reform measure that’s sparked reaction from teachers, school service personnel and their unions.

The House Education Committee meets on Feb. 8, 2019
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia House of Delegates committee has whittled down a sweeping and controversial education reform bill to a point that it is virtually unrecognizable from the bill that the Senate passed earlier this week. The House Education Committee passed a strike-and-insert version on a 15-10 party-line vote Friday, with Republicans in support and Democrats opposed to advancing the measure.

Delegate Sean Hornbuckle speaks in the West Virginia House.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia House of Delegates has scheduled a second public hearing on a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. Lawmakers decided Friday, Feb. 8, to add a second chance for members of the public to express their thoughts on Senate Bill 451.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The floor of the West Virginia House erupted Thursday as delegates discussed Wednesday’s explosive meeting of the Committee on Governmental Organization. In that committee, members discussed an amendment to House Bill 2708. The amendment would have prevented adding protected classes -- such as members of the LGBTQ community, who are not currently stipulated in state code -- when making changes to city regulations and requirements.  

The proposed amendment was downed by the committee Wednesday on a 10-12 vote, but sparked more conversation on the House floor about protecting civil rights for those in the LGBTQ community. The amendment would have nullified anti-discrimination ordinances that have been passed around the state in recent years.

House Speaker Roger Hanshaw
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia House of Delegates will hold a public hearing on a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. At the request of Speaker Roger Hanshaw, the House Finance Committee will allow members of the public to share their thoughts about Senate Bill 451 at 8 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 11.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Wednesday, Feb. 6, 2019 at 6:00 p.m. 

The West Virginia House of Delegates’ Education Committee has outlined a draft strike-and-insert amendment to a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill.

In a Wednesday meeting, the committee outlined their proposed version of Senate Bill 451, which removes paycheck protection and a non-severability clause from the measure.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019 at 5:04 p.m.

 

It didn’t take long for Democrats in the West Virginia House of Delegates to try to derail a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. The measure, which ties pay raises to charter schools, education savings accounts and other provisions the teachers and the leaders of their unions oppose, saw a motion Tuesday, Feb. 5, that attempted to kill the bill.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: Feb. 4, 2019 at 10:40 p.m.

 

The West Virginia Senate has passed a sweeping and controversial bill that seeks to overhaul the state’s public education system. The measure’s fate is unclear in the House of Delegates. Whether teachers will strike in response to its passage in the Senate remains to be seen.

Patricia Rucker
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the West Virginia Senate debated Friday a long list of proposed amendments to a sweeping and controversial education reform bill. The measure, Senate Bill 451, ties school employee pay raises to a long list of provisions public educators oppose. During hours of debate, the bill saw some small, notable changes -- but remains largely intact.

House Banking and Insurance Chair Eric Nelson presides over the committee as they consider a bill proposing a banking fix to West Virginia's medical cannabis program.
Perry Bennett / WV Legislative Photography

A proposed banking solution to West Virginia’s medical cannabis law has cleared its first hurdle in the House of Delegates.

The lower chamber’s Banking and Insurance Committee approved House Bill 2538 Thursday.

Sen. Craig Blair presides over the Senate's Committee of the Whole on Jan. 30, 2019, to discuss SB 451, sweeping and controversial education reform bill.
Will Price / WV Legislative Photography

The full West Virginia Senate is set to consider amendments to a wide-ranging and controversial education reform bill Friday.

Senate Bill 451, also known as the omnibus education bill, cleared the chamber’s 34-member Committee of the Whole on an 18-16 roll call vote and advanced to the Senate proper. Republican Sens. Kenny Mann and Bill Hamilton joined Democrats as no votes.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate held a more than nine-and-a-half-hour committee meeting Wednesday as an entire body to focus on a long, sweeping and controversial education reform bill. The chamber’s 34-member Committee of the Whole was briefed on the measure, questioned counsel and heard presentations from expert witnesses. The committee has yet to move to the amendment stage or send the bill to the full floor for consideration -- leaving deliberations to continue Thursday.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

As members of the West Virginia Senate prepare to take up a wide-ranging education reform bill with the entire chamber acting as a committee, leaders in the Republican caucus have announced changes to the measure. However, Gov. Jim Justice continues to take issue will some of the remaining provisions -- going as far as suggesting he would veto the current version of the bill should it pass both the Senate and House.

Senate
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and will be updated.

 

A controversial piece of legislation focused on overhauling public education continues to move quickly through the West Virginia Senate. Lawmakers adopted a motion Monday, Jan. 28, to skip the bill’s second reference to the Senate Finance Committee and instead bring the bill before the full Senate as the Committee of the Whole.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Former West Virginia state Senator Richard Ojeda has announced he is dropping out of his bid seeking the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. The announcement comes just over two weeks that Ojeda announced he would leave the Senate and ten days after his resignation became effective.

Pages