Dave Mistich

Senior Reporter

A native of Washington, W.Va., Dave Mistich joined West Virginia Public Broadcasting in October of 2012, as the Charleston Reporter. He covered stories that ranged from the 2012 general election, the effects of Superstorm Sandy on Nicholas County and a feature on the burgeoning craft beer industry in the state. Dave has contributed to all locally-produced news and public affairs programs at West Virginia Public Broadcasting, including West Virginia Morning and Inside Appalachia, as well as The Legislature Today.

Dave has also contributed to NPR newscasts  and newsmagazine programs, including All Thing Considered, upon multiple occasions--covering the major gas line explosion in Sissionville in December 2012, U.S. Sen. Jay Rockefeller's announcement in January 2013 that he won't run for reelection in 2014, the murder of Mingo Co. sheriff Eugene Crum in April of 2013,  a set of new lawsuits against DuPont for their production of C8, and the January 2014 water crisis that affected 300,000 West Virginians across nine counties. He also covered the February 2015 CSX oil train derailment in Fayette County. 

In June 2013, his coverage of the Sissionville gas line explosion won an award for Best Breaking News from the West Virginia Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

When West Virginia Public Broadcasting launched its new web presence in October 2013, Dave became Digital Editor / Coordinator. In this role, Dave oversees news coverage online and works with the rest of the news staff in developing new and unique ways of telling stories on the web.

On Thanksgiving night 2013, West Virginia Public Radio premiered Mountain Stage at 30: A Radio Retrospective, an hour-long radio special/documentary that Dave produced on the history of the live performance radio show. Dave also took part in Mountain Stage's 30th Anniversary Celebration show and interviewed guests and former staff and crew during a live broadcast.

Before coming to West Virginia Public Broadcasting, Dave worked as a freelancer for various newspapers and magazines locally and around the country, including The Charleston Daily Mail,  Relix, and PopMatters, where he focused exclusively on critiquing and writing about popular music. 

A graduate of Marshall University’s W. Page Pitt School of Journalism & Mass Communications, Dave holds a Bachelor of Arts in Radio-Television Production & Management.  He has also served as an Innovator in Residence for West Virginia University's Reed College of Media, where he helped an experimental journalism course investigate water quality using sensors and data reporting.

Ways to Connect

Ben Curtis / AP Photo

Updated: Thursday, June 13, 2019 at 4:05 p.m.

A Morgantown drag performer who told police they were attacked over Memorial Day weekend has filed paperwork to discontinue an investigation into the incident. Local police say they found inconsistencies in the alleged victim's account of the incident and are following up on the matter.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A top Republican in the West Virginia Senate is calling on Gov  Jim Justice to resign.

Sen. Craig Blair, R-Berkeley, took aim at Gov. Justice first in a paid-for column in a weekend edition of The Martinsburg Journal and then with other news media on Monday.  

The west face of the Supreme Court of the United States is seen in this general view. Monday, March 11, 2019, in Washington D.C.
Mark Tenally / AP Photo

The West Virginia House of Delegates has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in a case attempting to overturn a decision by the state’s high court that dismissed impeachment cases last year.

Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Updated Monday, June 3, 2019 at 1:40 p.m.

 

The West Virginia Senate has passed a complex and controversial education reform bill that contains anti-strike provisions that say teachers can be fired for walking off the job and allows for the state’s first charter schools. The upper chamber also passed a measure creating education savings accounts, another controversial issue touted by majority Republicans.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography


The West Virginia Senate has adopted an amendment that would allow teachers to be fired or have their pay withheld for going on strike. That change, among others, was made Sunday, June 2, to a long and controversial education reform bill that will be up for a Senate vote Monday.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Republicans in the West Virginia Senate were unable Saturday to push a long, sweeping and controversial education reform measure to a vote. Now in the middle of a special legislative session on the matter, lawmakers have toiled over the issue for months -- while public educators have voiced strong opposition to proposed bills that include charter schools and education savings accounts.

John Raby / AP Photo

West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson, held a news conference Thursday to boost support for his sweeping education reform package, but questions remain over how long the upper chamber will take to approve those proposals.

Striking West Virginia teachers and supporters rally outside the House of Delegates chambers Tuesday, Feb. 19, 2019, at the state Capitol in Charleston, W.Va. Teachers rallied then to oppose a complex education bill making its way through the Legislature.
John Raby / AP Photo

With West Virginia Senate President Mitch Carmichael planning to address public education during a one-day special legislative session this weekend, leaders of teacher unions are gearing up to have their members at the Capitol.

 

A Senate spokeswoman says Carmichael and his members will begin work at 10 a.m. Saturday, June 1, to consider the 144-page “Student Success Act.”

 

Ben Curtis / AP Photo

Editor's Note: The alleged victim of this incident filed paperwork on Tuesday, June 11, 2019 to discontinue the police's investigation of the incident.

 

A reported attack on a black, gay man in Morgantown over Memorial Day weekend has sparked reaction from the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community, as well as renewed attention on West Virginia’s hate crime laws.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Republican leaders in the West Virginia Senate have rolled out their latest plan for education reform. The 144-page bill, dubbed the “Student Success Act”, was released Friday afternoon by Senate President Mitch Carmichael, R-Jackson.

“This bill boldly incorporates many suggestions and recommendations from the education forums that were held throughout the state,” Carmichael said in a Friday statement. “It reflects the input of teachers, students, and parents. There is widespread recognition that our state’s education system can be improved.”

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Issues related to public education lingered heavily in the background -- and at times worked their way to the front -- of a Monday special session of the West Virginia Legislature.

Jay LaPrete / AP Photo

West Virginia University president E. Gordon Gee responded Friday to a report from Ohio State University that says a team doctor sexually abused students for nearly two decades.

 

Ohio State University released an investigative report Friday that says Dr. Richard Strauss sexually abused 177 male students between 1979 and 1997.

oxycontin
Toby Talbot / Associated Press

Five more state attorney generals have announced they have filed suit against the manufacturer of the highly addictive opioid OxyContin and it’s former chief executive.

 

West Virginia’s suit, announced Thursday by state Attorney General Patrick Morrisey, alleges that the Purdue Pharma used unlawful marketing tactics that fueled a scourge of opioid addiction and related deaths.

Senate Education Chair Patricia Rucker and Senate President Mitch Carmichael meet at the podium on Tuesday, Jan. 29, 2019.
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia lawmakers are scheduled to return to Charleston at 2 p.m. on Monday to reconvene a special session on education betterment that was called months ago. But Republican leaders have yet to agree on exactly what kinds of reforms will be considered. So instead of focusing on education, the special session will likely address bills Governor Jim Justice vetoed on technical grounds.

West Virginia Department of Education

A new report on public education in West Virginia could be a roadmap for lawmakers who are set to focus on improving the state’s system. The report comes after a long, sweeping and  controversial education reform bill was rejected by the state Legislature earlier this year -- a measure that caused public school workers to walk off the job for two days.

Eric Nelson
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A longtime Republican member of the West Virginia House of Delegates is vying for a seat in the state Senate. Del. Eric Nelson of Kanawha County made the announcement Tuesday outside the state Capitol.

In this Jan. 19, 2019 phot, Del. Paul Espinosa (R-Jefferson) speaks on the floor of the House of Delegates.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia lawmaker who once chaired the House Education Committee will return to that role for an upcoming special session.

Del. Paul Espinosa (R-Jefferson), who has been serving as Majority Whip for the Republican-led House of Delegate, will the fill vacancy for the top seat on the House Education Committee. He said House Speaker Roger Hanshaw (R-Clay) alerted him of the appointment ahead of a Sunday evening conference call with their caucus.

John Raby / AP Photo

Two members of the West Virginia House of Delegates are urging the state’s attorney general to put money from a recently announced settlement with a pharmaceutical distributor towards substance abuse treatment.

Del. Kayla Kessinger (R-Fayette) and Del. Andrew Robinson (D-Kanawha) sent a letter Friday to Attorney General Patrick Morrisey asking for the $37 million settlement with drug distributor McKesson Corporation to be deposited in the Ryan Brown Addiction Prevention and Recovery Fund.

In this file photo, Del. Danny Hamrick speaks on the House floor on Feb. 13, 2019.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Wednesday, May 1, 2019 at 5:15 p.m.

Weeks ahead of a special session that will focus on education, the top ranking member of a House of Delegates committee is stepping down from their post because of a personal relationship he says is viewed as disrespectful.

House Education Chair Danny Hamrick (R-Harrison) submitted a letter Tuesday to Speaker Roger Hanshaw (R-Clay).

Lucio Eastman / wikipedia.org/Free State Project

West Virginia’s Legislative Auditor has issued a report and other materials related to the state’s inventory of firearms and ammunition. According to materials released Tuesday, there are gaps in inventory and reporting requirements for many state agencies.

 

A legislative audit says 58 state agencies are exempt from state purchasing requirements and, therefore, would not be subject to firearms inventories.

St. John's County Sheriff's Office

Some Democratic members of the West Virginia House of Delegates are calling for action against a state agency director who was charged with domestic battery earlier this month.

Flood
Dave Mistich / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The West Virginia Legislature’s Joint Committee on Flooding is set to meet Tuesday in Charleston. State lawmakers established the panel following devastating floods in June 2016 that claimed 23 lives and destroyed thousands of homes and businesses.

Courtesy Woody Thrasher for Governor

A former West Virginia Department of Commerce secretary forced out of his job last year will challenge his old boss for the governor’s seat.

Businessman Woody Thrasher announced Tuesday, April 16, he’s running for the Republican nomination for governor in 2020. He filed precandidate paperwork at the Secretary of State’s office that afternoon.

Berkeley County Sheriff's Department / sheriff.berkeleywv.org

The Berkeley County Sheriff’s Department has announced that two deputies involved in a November incident will return to duty.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

This is a developing story and may be updated.

 

A federal grand jury has issued a subpoena to the West Virginia Department of Commerce related to the sponsorship of a PGA golf tournament held at The Greenbrier and a non-profit offshoot of the resort. The subpoena called on the state commerce department to hand over records to the U.S. Department of Justice last week.

Gov. Jim Justice -- whose family's companies own The Greenbrier, a golf tournament that takes place there and other entities -- is named in the subpoena, along with his children and others involved in the family's businesses and organizations.

West Virginia Regional Jail Authority

A Missouri man who was arrested Wednesday on his way to the White House and Pentagon has been identified through a criminal complaint. The traffic stop shut down Interstate 68 in Preston County for hours.

A criminal complaint filed with the Preston County Magistrate Court states that 42-year-old Eric Charron of Kansas City, Missouri was traveling at 130 miles per hour before being stopped by Trooper First Class D.W. Satterfield of the West Virginia State Police.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Hours ahead of a midnight deadline to take action on bills from the regular legislative session, Gov. Jim Justice has announced a final set of approvals and vetoes.

Of the 294 bills passed this regular session, Justice signed 266 pieces of legislation and vetoed 28.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Updated Tuesday, March 26, 2019 at 4:50 p.m.

 

With a deadline looming for West Virginia’s executive branch to take action on bills passed this legislative session, staff of the governor’s office is making their way through hundreds of measures. By Tuesday afternoon, Gov. Jim Justice had signed some notable pieces of legislation but also had left the fate of other bills unknown.

 

According to the Legislature’s website, Justice signed more than 45 bills on Monday. That’s in addition to dozens of measures signed during and after the legislative session, which ended March 9.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice has announced a plan to address deteriorating secondary roads in West Virginia.

Justice said it is unknown how much it will cost to address issues with secondary roads. However, he said he plans to hire hundreds of temporary highway workers, many of whom he hopes will become permanent. Additionally, the plan includes purchasing maintenance equipment.  

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Legislature’s 60-day regular session could very well be remembered more for the bills that failed as those that passed. Top-priority proposals -- and some measures that sprung up through the legislative process -- fell by the wayside as the clock ticked toward midnight Saturday and lawmakers adjourned sine die.

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