Corey Knollinger

Glynis Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Organizations in West Virginia like the Community Foundation of the Ohio Valley (CFOV) are working to address youth retention in West Virginia by exposing current college students to opportunities that exist in the region.

Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Several breweries across the state are hosting events as part of West Virginia Craft Beer Week, which kicked off this past weekend, June 15-16. Some in the craft beer industry are celebrating new regulations that the state legislature passed earlier this spring.

Serenity Hills Life Center

A new residential recovery center is opening its doors in Wheeling this June. The Serenity Hills Life Center will host an open house for the public this week.

West Virginia Children's Health Insurance Program

Governor Jim Justice has announced the appointment of a new director for the state’s Children’s Health Insurance Program.

Charleston Area Medical Center

A study conducted by the Charleston Area Medical Center Health Education and Research Institute and West Virginia University found a relationship between income and the risk of dying from a stroke.


Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Most people are familiar with the idea of first aid — like what to do to when dealing with a cut or scrape — but not everyone knows what to do when their friend is showing signs of mental illness. There’s a class dedicated having a better mental health first aid response. One of these classes was recently held in the Northern Panhandle.  


Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

After West Virginia’s voter ID law went into effect last year an organization focused on increasing voter registration and voter turnout launched a new initiative in the state to help people gain proper identification. Spread the Vote now operates in nine states, and aims not only to give people a chance to vote, but also a better chance in life.

Rebecca Kiger

Science can be a hard subject to understand, especially upper-level higher-ed science courses. A professor in West Virginia’s Northern Panhandle is creatively cracking the code to help his students understand tricky topics.

Joe Horzempa is an associate professor of Biology at West Liberty University, and he has what could be described as an unorthodox way of teaching science. 

John Deskins / West Virginia University

Economists at West Virginia University say parts of the state are seeing job growth after economic downturn, but other areas have a longer road to economic recovery.  

Wetzel County 4-H and FFA Ham Bacon and Egg Sale
Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Across the state, high schools offer career and technical education to give students a leg up in their fields before graduating. These programs can include skilled trades like welding, shop classes, or even meat processing.


Explorer Academy People in Hall
Clark Davis / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

 

West Virginia is one of only two states to lose population in the last 10 years, according to recently-released data analysis by the non-profit The Pew Charitable Trusts.

 

According to census data analyzed by the group, West Virginia has lost about 34,500 people since 2008. Over the last decade, the data showed West Virginia’s population dropped two-tenths of a percent each year on average.

Cory Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Teachers and service personnel in the Northern Panhandle joined picket lines this morning and were on their way home before a typical school day would have closed. Many teachers were relieved, but uneasy.

Corey Knollinger / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia’s small but active hip-hop community is striving to normalize hip-hop as an art form. The YWCA in Wheeling recently held an event called Hip Hop: A Black Tie Affair to help bring legitimacy to the community in the Northern Panhandle.  

 


 

Shayla Klein / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Along the banks of the Ohio River and other waterways, there are several places where -- after a heavy rain -- Native American artifacts still crop up today. Despite these clues, archeologists and historians haven’t been able to paint a clear picture of the people who lived here before white settlers.

Artifacts have led archeologists to believe people first came to the region about 14,000 years ago, hunting woolly mammoths and dodging sabertooth cats. There were also people here 2,500 years ago building mounds. But most of what is known outside of that revolves around tribes that lived in the region around the late 1600’s -- tribes  forced to relocate in the mid 1800’s. And there’s a lot of speculation about that, too.