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Child's Halloween Treat was Marijuana Derivative, Not Heroin

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Updated on Friday, November 3 at 2:39 p.m.

West Virginia police say lab results on a substance found in a child's trick-or-treat bag came back as a derivative of marijuana, not heroin as originally thought.

WSAZ-TV reports the substance was field-tested on Tuesday night in Oak Hill and had tested as heroin. No one was injured, including the 3-year-old girl whose bag it was found in.

The substance was then tested by the West Virginia State Police lab.

Oak Hill Police Chief Mike Whisman says the discovery doesn't change the severity of the offense.

Whisman says the girl's mother had called police after finding a dark substance wrapped in a glove.

No arrests have been made in the case.

Original Post:

Police say heroin was found in a child's trick-or-treat bag in West Virginia.

Oak Hill Police Chief Mike Whisman told news outlets that the 3-year-old girl's mother found a dark substance wrapped in a glove, and called police. Preliminary results from a field test revealed it was heroin.

No one was hurt. The mother, Stacey Norris, told WOAY-TV she initially thought the glove was the result of someone playing a joke.

Police say they will send the substance to the State Police Crime Lab in Charleston for official confirmation. There are no suspects at this time.

The chief said the substance likely came from Hidden Valley, an area where hundreds of children go trick-or-treating each Halloween.


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