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Banjos, Buzzing Bees And 'No Hate In My Holler'

Beekeeping Margaret
West Virginia Public Broadcasting
Folkways reporter Margaret Mcleod Leef learns about beekeeping in Summers County, WV at Appalachian Beekeeping Collective.

On this week’s episode, we begin our journey through Appalachia in the meadows and woods of West Virginia to catch the buzz on beekeeping.

We’ll also revisit our interview with Pocahontas County, West Virginia native Trevor Hammons. The young banjo player decided to carry on his family’s traditions of storytelling, wild lore and old-time music.

Then, we’ll check in with Kentucky artist Lacy Hale, who designed her iconic “No Hate In My Holler” screenprint five years ago. Appalachians are still telling her how much they identify with its message.

You can hear that and more in our latest tour Inside Appalachia.

In This Episode:

The Buzz On Beekeeping

Mark Lilly Beekeeping
Margaret Mcleod Leef
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West Virginia Public Broadcasting
Mark Lilly inspects a frame of his honeybee hive.

We begin among the trees — in stands of black locust and tulip poplars — with a report from our Folkways reporter Margaret Leef, who checks in with a community of West Virginia beekeepers.

Music Comes Naturally To Son Of Hammons Legends

Trevor Hammons
Trevor Hammons, a member of the famed Hammons family of Pocahontas County, West Virginia.

The Hammons Family of Pocahontas County, West Virginia are known around the world for their distinctive old-time music that reflects the early Appalachian frontier of the Mountain State. Nine members of the Hammons family — Edden, Pete, Maggie, Sherman, Burl, Lee, Currence, Mintie and Dona — were inducted into the West Virginia Music Hall Of Fame in 2020.

We’re listening back to our story from 2020, when we first met 22-year-old Trevor Hammons, who is helping to ensure his family’s musical legacy lives on.

No Hate In My Holler

No Hate In My Holler
Lacy Hale
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Courtesy
"No Hate In My Holler," a screenprint by Lacy Hale.
IMG_5576.jpeg
Artist Lacy Hale's mural, honoring Nancy Mullins Shores, a beloved local midwife in Pound, Virginia.

In Eastern Kentucky, artist Lacy Hale has been painting murals and dabbling in other art forms for years. In 2017, her screenprint “No Hate In My Holler” — designed in response to a Nazi rally — went viral.

That image still resonates with Appalachians and can be found all over social media. Our host Mason Adams spoke with Hale about her work for this week’s episode.

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Our theme music is by Matt Jackfert. Other music this week is by Long Point String Band, Ona, Chris Stapleton and the Hammons Family. Bill Lynch is our producer. Alex Runyon is our associate producer. Our executive producer is Eric Douglas. Kelley Libby is our editor. Our audio mixer is Patrick Stephens. Zander Aloi also helped produce this episode.

You can find us on Twitter @InAppalachia and on Instagram @inappalachia

You can also send us an email to InsideAppalachia@wvpublic.org.

Stay Connected
Inside Appalachia Co-Host/Folkways Reporter, mason.j.adams@gmail.com, @MasonAtoms
Inside Appalachia Producer, blynch@wvpublic.org, @LostHwys
Kelley Libby is a Virginia-based public radio editor and producer. She currently edits for Inside Appalachia and its Folkways Reporting Project at WVPB. You can reach here at kelleylibby@gmail.com
Alex Runyon is a proud Huntington, West Virginia native. She attended Marshall University and earned degrees in creative writing and literary studies, dabbling in journalism, photography and women’s studies along the way. She worked as a freelance photographer and social media strategist before joining the Inside Appalachia team as Associate Producer. Alex enjoys writing and performing stand up comedy, hiking, screenwriting and playing board games. She lives in Huntington, West Virginia with her cat, Waylon Kittings. Follow her on Twitter @_AlexRunyon.