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What Russia doesn’t want you to know and how it keeps you from knowing it

Crimeans wave Russian flags as they celebrate the first anniversary of the referendum in Sevastopol, Crimea.
Crimeans wave Russian flags as they celebrate the first anniversary of the referendum in Sevastopol, Crimea.

Following the passage of laws in Russia last week, a journalist or civilian can now receive up to 15 years in prison for publicly opposing the war in Ukraine—or for even calling it a “war” to begin with. 

This new censorship law is part of a larger effort by the Kremlin to control the narrative of the war inside and outside the country. 

Several western news organizations including the BBC, CBS, and ABC have suspended reporting in Russia over safety concerns. NPR says it will continue to assess what the new law means for the organization’s operations in the country. A number of Russian independent news organizations have also shuttered. 

The law doesn’t only impact traditional media. Russia blocked access to Facebook and Twitter in retaliation for removing content by Russian-backed media outlets like Russia Today and Sputnik.

We dive into the troubling pattern of censorship in Russia.

Copyright 2022 WAMU 88.5

Haili Blassingame

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