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The Sounds Of America: “Cheap Trick At Budokan”

"Cheap Trick At Budokan” was only supposed to have a limited release. But it ended up being the album that broke through for the band.
"Cheap Trick At Budokan” was only supposed to have a limited release. But it ended up being the album that broke through for the band.

The Library of Congress hosts over 160 million books, manuscripts and photographs. 

And every year,  the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress chooses 25 pieces of sound, from its collection and beyond, that showcase America’s sound-rich heritage. The archive contains iconic clips of music, news, theater and sports.  

In this edition of  “The Sounds Of America,” we hear one of this year’s selections: “Cheap Trick at Budokan.“

From the 2008 Pitchfork review:

If punk taught us that anyone can do it, then Cheap Trick showed that anyone could make it. Their 1979 commercial breakthrough,  At Budokan, is not just one of rock’s greatest live albums, but also one of its most triumphant underdog tales, an exemplar of pre-internet viral phenomena: Originally planned as a cheaply produced, limited-edition Japanese-only release, the record eventually– through steady import sales, airplay from discerning stateside DJs, and increasing request-line activity– transformed these bar-circuit workhorses into multi-platinum superstars. They really don’t make ’em like this anymore.

This series is produced by Ben Manilla and Jennie Cataldo for BMP Audio in association with the National Recording Registry at the Library of Congress. 

Copyright 2020 WAMU 88.5. To see more, visit WAMU 88.5.

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