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Chef Samin Nosrat's Favorite Book And Album Of The Decade

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

2020, a new decade, is just around the corner. So we asked a few artists about the best of the 2010s. Here's chef Samin Nosrat, the New York Times best-selling author of "Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat," on her favorite book and album of the decade.

SAMIN NOSRAT: For me, one of the most powerful pieces of art that I've consumed is the novel "Americanah" by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie.

(SOUNDBITE OF AUDIOBOOK, "AMERICANAH")

ADJOA ANDOH: (Reading) Dear non-American black, when you make the choice to come to America, you become black. Stop arguing. Stop saying - I'm Jamaican or I'm Ghanaian. America doesn't care. So what if you weren't black in your country? You're in America now.

NOSRAT: I spent my childhood disappearing into books. And you know, most of the books I read as a girl were about white protagonists. And it was really remarkable for me to see so much of myself as a woman of color in this book and in this protagonist.

(SOUNDBITE OF SOLANGE'S "MAD")

NOSRAT: The other most incredible (laughter) and powerful piece of art that is probably my most listened to album is "A Seat At The Table" by Solange Knowles.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAD")

SOLANGE: (Singing) You got the light...

NOSRAT: I mean, I knew she was Beyonce's sister. I knew she was a musician and an artist in her own right, and I couldn't believe it. Oh, my God (laughter).

I really love the interstitials, the interviews with her mother and incredible people talking about overcoming racism and having success. And probably my most listened to song on the album is "Mad" 'cause it just lets me sort of get my anger and frustration out in a pretty - like, a healthy way.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAD")

SOLANGE: (Singing) Why you always gotta be - why you always gotta be so mad? Be mad, be mad, be mad. I got a lot to be mad about.

NOSRAT: For both of these works of art, I'm really grateful that they exist. I don't think I really understood that I was being left out until I saw myself reflected in art. And I hope that it just continues to happen and more and more people feel included and seen.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "MAD")

SOLANGE: (Singing) Where'd your love go? Where'd your love go?

MARTIN: Chef Samin Nosrat sharing her favorite book and album of the decade. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.


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