Wheeling

June 22, 1926: Earl Olgebay Dies at 77

Jun 22, 2017
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

Earl Oglebay died on June 22, 1926, at age 77. The son of a wealthy Wheeling businessman, he became head of his father’s bank at age 28, making him the nation’s youngest bank president. In the late 1800s, Oglebay partnered with John D. Rockefeller in a Cleveland iron business. He amassed a small fortune in 1901, when he sold his iron interests to U.S. Steel.

Sarah Taylor

"We need to work to retain young musicians so we can continue to grow the scene from within."

June 19, 1786: Indian Ambush Changes Lewis Wetzel's Life

Jun 19, 2017
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

On June 19, 1786, a tragic hunting trip changed pioneer Lewis Wetzel’s life forever. Wetzel, his father, and two brothers ventured out from their home near Wheeling and were ambushed by Indians. The attackers killed his father and one brother and badly wounded the other brother.

This Week in West Virginia History.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online.

On June 13, 1861, a committee led by John Carlile of Clarksburg presented a Declaration of Rights of the People of Virginia to the Second Wheeling Convention.

The convention was the first major step toward West Virginia statehood, and the declaration is perhaps the most significant document in our state’s history.

Civil War cannon at Harpers Ferry
Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A plan to relocate a Civil War monument from Wheeling Park to a grassy area at West Virginia Independence Hall has been postponed.

The Intelligencer/Wheeling News-Register reports a monument committee met last week to discuss the relocation, which was announced last year.

E-WV / West Virginia Humanities Council

Labor leader Walter Reuther was killed in a plane crash on May 9, 1970. He was 62.

Reuther was born in Wheeling in 1907. His father, Valentine, was president of the Wheeling brewers union and led the city’s Socialist Party.

May 1, 1879: Jack Glasscock Makes Major Debut

May 1, 2017
Jack Glasscock
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Jack Glasscock—one of the best shortstops in history—made his major league debut on May 1, 1879, with the Cleveland Blues. He was born in Wheeling in 1859 and learned to play baseball on the sandlots of his hometown.

He earned the nickname “Pebbly Jack” due to his habit of picking up and tossing away pebbles in the field—and some baseball historians think the pebbles were just a figment of Jack’s imagination.

Wheeling Island Stadium
Wehwalt / Wikimedia Commons

Repair efforts are underway at a Wheeling stadium after a large concrete panel fell from the seating area.

Media outlets report that contractors were using a crane to remove a panel they found damaged Friday at Wheeling Island Stadium. Upon the panel's removal, an adjacent panel came loose and fell to the ground.

classroom
Arria Belli / Wikimedia Commons

Bishop Michael Bransfield of the Wheeling-Charleston has released a letter elaborating on the decision to close Bishop Donahue High School at the end of the academic year.

    

In a letter published Thursday in The Intelligencer of Wheeling, Bransfield said issues that led to the decision to close the school included shrinking enrollment and the resulting financial burden to the diocese.

Glynisi Board / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Some residents from the Northern Panhandle region organized a protest outside Wheeling municipal offices this week. They want city council to consider declaring the town a "sanctuary city" which is a "municipality that adopts a policy of protecting unauthorized immigrants by not prosecuting them for violating federal immigration laws and by ensuring that all residents have access to city services, regardless of immigration status."


In reality, McCarthy didn’t have an actual list.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online & The Wheeling Intelligencer / WV Humanities Council

On February 9, 1950, a speech in Wheeling given by U.S. Senator Joseph McCarthy altered the course of history.

During his speech at the McClure Hotel, the Wisconsin Republican held up a piece of paper that allegedly listed 205 communists who worked for the U.S. State Department.

It was a pivotal moment in the early Cold War and propelled McCarthy into the national spotlight.

It devastated communities along the entire 1000-mile stretch of the Ohio.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / WV Humanities Council

On January 28, 1937, the Ohio River crested in Huntington nearly 20 feet above flood stage. Days earlier, it’d crested at the same level in Parkersburg and 10 feet above flood stage in Wheeling.

The Ohio River had always been prone to flooding. Just 10 months before, the Ohio had hit record levels at Wheeling.

Wikimedia commons / Brandon W. Holmes

The city of Wheeling is going to spend $35,000 to demolish a row of houses on Wheeling Island that were damaged in a fire earlier this month.

The Intelligencer and Wheeling News-Register reports that the City Council unanimously approved the expenditure this week to demolish the five homes.

Wheeling Island
TimK MSI / Wikimedia Commons

The cause of a fire that damaged five Wheeling homes has yet to be determined, as well as what the final fate of the buildings will be.

The Intelligencer reports the Wheeling Fire Department responded to the blaze shortly after midnight on Monday. No one was injured in the fire but two families were displaced and a dog was killed.

Wikimedia commons / Brandon W. Holmes

Wheeling has become West Virginia's 11th city to pass a policy protecting the housing and employment rights for LGBT citizens.

The Wheeling City Council voted 7-0 to establish new anti-discrimination protections in the city's human rights ordinance based on sexual orientation, gender identity and veteran status on Tuesday.

U.S. Attorney's Office / United States Department of Justice

The top federal prosecutor responsible for the northern district of West Virginia says he will resign at year's end.

U.S. Attorney William Ihlenfeld, appointed six years ago by Democratic President Barack Obama, says he'll return to private law practice.

solar panels atop the garage attached to the First State Capitol Building
Glynis Board / WVPB

A Catholic Charities social services building serving residents of West Virginia and Ohio is installing solar panels in response to Pope Francis' call for caring for the environment.

Wikimedia commons / Brandon W. Holmes

The state commerce secretary, a congressman and the Republican nominee for governor are headlining an energy conference in northern West Virginia.

The Consumer Energy Alliance's West Virginia Energy and Manufacturing Forum will take place Wednesday at the Oglebay Conference Center in Wheeling.

Wikimedia commons / Brandon W. Holmes

The Robert C. Byrd Intermodal Transportation Center in Wheeling will operate at a loss for the current fiscal year, with taxpayers covering an estimated $81,000 deficit for the facility.

The Intelligencer reports the center's total operating cost for the coming fiscal year is expected to be $403,005.

Projected revenues are $254,000.

Bishop John Joseph Kain served as bishop of the Wheeling Diocese, and Archbishop of St. Louis.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / John Joseph Kain, Martinsburg, Wheeling, Diocese of Wheeling, St. Louis, Civil War, Harpers Ferry

Roman Catholic Bishop John Joseph Kain died on October 13, 1903, at the age of 62. In the late 1800s, he was the driving force behind the growth of the Catholic church in West Virginia.

Kain was ordained as a priest in 1866. His first pastoral assignment was in his native town of Martinsburg. His missions ranged from nearby Harpers Ferry to Leesburg, Virginia. During his seven years in this position, he helped rebuild communities that had been ravaged by the Civil War.

La Belle Iron Works
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

The Wheeling-La Belle Nail Company closed on September 30, 2010, ending more than 150 years in business. The company was founded in 1852 in South Wheeling as the La Belle Ironworks.

It manufactured cut nails—a key construction material in 19th-century America. By 1875, Wheeling was known as the Nail City, and La Belle was the city’s leading nail producer.

Chu Berry
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

Musician Leon “Chu” Berry was born in Wheeling on September 13, 1910. He became one of the most highly regarded saxophonists of the Swing Era, ranking alongside Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young.

At West Virginia State College (now University), Berry performed with the Edwards Collegians and other regional groups.

Brunch, Alcohol
MAT HAYWARD / Dollar Photo Club

The Wheeling City Council will ask state officials for permission to legalize the sale of alcohol in the city Sunday mornings.

The Intelligencer reports that council members unanimously approved an ordinance Tuesday to submit an amendment to the West Virginia Municipal Home Rule Board.

Ft Henry, Wheeling
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

On the morning of September 1, 1777, about 200 Wyandot and Mingo Indians attacked Fort Henry at Wheeling. The fort was defended by about 60 militia—nearly half of whom were lured outside the post and killed by the Indians.

The Indians then launched a siege of the fort for three days and nights. After burning cabins and outbuildings in the region, they withdrew across the Ohio River.

It was the first of two Indian attacks on Fort Henry during the Revolutionary War. The second attack, which occurred five years later, was the occasion for Betty Zane’s heroic actions.

Wheeling's Suspension Bridge
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

On August 31, 1852, a new federal law gave the Wheeling Suspension Bridge special protection as a mail-carrying route. While it may sound humdrum, the law was actually pivotal in ensuring the bridge’s survival.

The Wheeling Suspension Bridge had opened to great fanfare in 1849.With a 1,010-foot main span, it was the longest bridge of its type in the world.

But, while Wheeling celebrated its new landmark, western Pennsylvanians were quietly plotting its destruction.

Congressman Chester Hubbard
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

Congressman, businessman, and state founder Chester Hubbard died in Wheeling on August 23, 1891, at age 76. The Connecticut native moved with his family to Wheeling as a child.

Hubbard joined his father’s lumber mill business and helped develop Wheeling as an iron and steel manufacturing center. He was president of the German Bank of Wheeling; the Pittsburgh, Wheeling & Kentucky Railroad; and C. D. Hubbard and Company.

Edward Franzheim
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

Edward Franzheim was born in Wheeling on July 20, 1866. After studying in Boston and abroad, he returned to Wheeling in 1890 to practice architecture. He was one of the first West Virginians to receive a formal, academic training in architecture.

One of his best-known works is Wheeling’s Vance Memorial Presbyterian Church. The 1896 building is one of the most exuberant and lavish churches in the state. By 1902, Franzheim was recognized by many as West Virginia’s most successful architect.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Coming up at 7:41 On West Virginia Morning, the first of two reports about trade.  It’s become a focal point in the presidential campaign, but how does trade affect companies in our region?  And Glynis Board takes us to Blues Fest in Wheeling.

Wheeling Steel
e-WV / WV Humanitites Council

One June 21, 1920, the LaBelle Iron Works, Whitaker-Glessner, and Wheeling Steel & Iron Works combined to form the Wheeling Steel Corporation.

With some 17,000 workers, Wheeling Steel was the nation’s third-largest steelmaker.

Author Rebecca Harding Davis
Wikipedia / WV Humanitites Council

Author Rebecca Harding Davis was born in Pennsylvania on June 24, 1831. She and her family moved to Wheeling about 1836, and she later wrote for the Wheeling Intelligencer newspaper. During the 1860s, she published a number of stories and serialized novels in the Atlantic Monthly.

Her best-known story, “Life in the Iron Mills: A Story of Today” powerfully depicts the plight of mill workers in a town based on Wheeling. Her first two novels focused on worker exploitation and moral and political conflicts raised by the Civil War.

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