West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and may be updated.

West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Beth Walker has been spared in her impeachment trial and will remain in office. The verdict came Tuesday after Senators deliberated for more than an hour over one article of impeachment accusing her -- and three other justices on the state's high court -- of maladministration for failing to hold on another accountable in a nearly year-long scandal involving court spending. 

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A West Virginia Supreme Court justice standing trial in the Court of Impeachment expressed regret for her role in a nearly year-long scandal involving spending while asserting that she doesn’t feel she should be removed from office. Senators, acting as jurors, heard testimony from four witnesses in the trial of Justice Beth Walker as proceedings kicked off Monday.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has dismissed cases seeking to challenge appointments to -- and a special election campaign for -- the high court. Arguments were heard Monday and an order was issued hours later in matters involving Congressman Evan Jenkins and former House Speaker Tim Armstead.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: Thursday, Sept. 13, 2018 at 5:28 p.m.

 

West Virginia’s House Minority Whip is requesting the governor to call the legislature back into session to consider impeaching a former state Supreme Court justice who was not included in earlier proceedings.

 

In a Thursday letter, Del. Mike Caputo asked the Gov. Jim Justice to bring lawmakers back to Charleston to consider impeaching former Justice Menis Ketchum.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

A candidate for the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals has filed suit to remove another candidate from the ballot and seeks to prohibit the recent temporary appointments of two justices to the bench of the state’s high court.

Charleston attorney William Schwartz has filed a writ of mandamus and a writ of prohibition with the West Virginia Supreme Court to have Congressman Evan Jenkins' name removed from the November ballot in his bid for a seat on the bench and stop his appointment. The filing also argues that former House Speaker Tim Armstead’s appointment is unconstitutional.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Two West Virginia Supreme Court justices awaiting impeachment trials have filed motions with the state Senate ahead of pre-trial proceedings. Attorneys for Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justice Beth Walker filed motions with the Senate Clerk's office Friday, with Workman asking for her trial to begin after mid-October and Walker asking for her case to be dismissed altogether.

Office of Gov. Jim Justice

Gov. Jim Justice appointed West Virginia House Speaker Tim Armstead and Congressman Evan Jenkins to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.

The appointments will last until a November special election to fill the remainder of the terms and follow controversy that has surrounded the state’s high court, leading to impeachments, resignations and federal charges.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The West Virginia Senate has begun its part in the impeachment of West Virginia Supreme Court justices. The chamber gaveled in Monday and adopted rules of procedure that will dictate the Court of Impeachment.

Thorney Lieberman / West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

This is a developing list. Please check back for more details.

Last updated on Aug. 21, 2018 at 2:46 p.m.

Two West Virginia Supreme Court seats will appear on the midterm election ballot later this fall.

West Virginians have until midnight on Aug. 21 to file for either seat. Voters will decide on Nov. 6 who fills those seats.

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Margaret Workman
Courtesy West Virginia Press Association

Two justices of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals say they will not resign, despite being impeached by the House of Delegates.

The Tuesday announcements from Chief Justice Margaret Workman and Justice Beth Walker came hours before a deadline that would trigger a November special election to fill the remainder of any terms left by vacancies. Their statements followed the resignation of another justice Tuesday.

W.Va. Supreme Court Justice Robin Davis announcing her retirement on August 14, 2018.
West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

This is a developing story and will be updated.

Following the impeachment of all four remaining justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, Justice Robin Davis has announced her retirement. She made the annoucement Tuesday morning in the court chambers. Her retirement is effective Monday, August 13.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For up-to-the-minute updates,   on Twitter.

The House of Delegates voted Monday to impeach all four remaining justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. Eleven articles of impeachment have been adopted over the course of proceedings that have strectched more than 14 hours.

West Virginia Judiciary

Updated: August 10, 2018 at 12:10 p.m.

 

A Cabell County circuit judge has been appointed to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals during the suspension of Justice Allen Loughry. The appointment comes as four justices on the state’s high court may be impeached.

West Virginia's House Judiciary Committee has adopted articles of impeachment against all four justices on the state's Supreme Court of Appeals, accusing the judges of a range of crimes and throwing the court's immediate future into disarray.

Approved on Tuesday afternoon, the articles of impeachment recommend that the entire bench — Chief Justice Margaret Workman, Justice Allen Loughry, Justice Robin Davis and Justice Elizabeth Walker – be impeached "for maladministration, corruption, incompetency, neglect of duty, and certain high crimes and misdemeanors."

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and will be updated. Please refresh this page for the latest. Updated: August 7, 2018 at 6:15 p.m.

 

The House Judiciary Committee has adopted articles of impeachment against the entire bench of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals. The articles were introduced Tuesday morning after more than a month of testimony and presentation of evidence.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee have proposed articles of impeachment against embattled West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry. They say they have heard enough evidence to impeach Loughry and point to a deadline that would force a special election in November to fill the remainder of his term.

Bob Bird / AP Photo

Updated: Tuesday, July 31, 2018 at 1:14 p.m.

A former West Virginia Supreme Court Justice has agreed to plead guilty to charges of fraud and is cooperating with prosecutors. The plea agreement comes as the high court’s bench is under scrutiny for the private use of state resources.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Delegates on the House Judiciary Committee heard more detail Friday about renovations to the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals and other spending by the court.

Justin Robinson of the Legislative Post Audits Division outlined the court’s spending for the committee, which -- since 2010 -- includes more than $1.5 million for renovations to the justices’ offices.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: July 26, 2018 at 3:00 p.m. For more information on the potentional impeachments, see this explainer.

Lawmakers on the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony Thursday from former West Virginia Supreme Court administrator Steve Canterbury. It’s part of an ongoing impeachment investigation of one or more justices on state’s high court.

 

Allen Loughry
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the possible impeachments, see this explainer

 

A committee investigating possible impeachment of one or more justices on the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals will return to Charleston for a third round of hearing evidence and testimony. The proceedings come as one justice pleaded not guilty Wednesday to additional federal charges.

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

The West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission says it has closed ethics investigations involving three state Supreme Court justices without disciplinary action.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated: July 23, 2018 at 5:55 p.m.

 

A committee of West Virginia lawmakers investigating the possible impeachment of one or more state Supreme Court and an administrator for the court are continuing to negotiate the terms of a tour of the high court’s offices. The negotiations follow concerns last week over press freedoms and open meetings laws -- as the committee agreed to delay the orginally scheduled tour.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the potential Supreme Court impeachments, see this explainer.

West Virginia lawmakers have resumed hearings on the possible impeachment of one or more state Supreme Court justices. Members of the House Judiciary Committee heard testimony Thursday from four current employees of the court -- focused mainly on suspended Justice Allen Loughry.

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

A federal prosecutor in West Virginia has tacked on an additional charge against a state Supreme Court Justice who was indicted last month on charges of fraud, witness tampering and making false statements.

U.S. Attorney for the Southern Distict of West Virginia Mike Stuart announced that a superseding indictment against West Virginia Supreme Court Justice Allen Loughry was unsealed Tuesday, adding the charge of obstruction of justice to 22 other counts that have been mounted against the embattled judg

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

For more information on the potential Supreme Court impeachments, see this explainer.

The House Judiciary Committee continued its meetings Friday on the possible impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court justices. The second day of testimony focused heavily on suspended Justice Allen Loughry and his private use of state resources. The justices also delivered a letter to the committee critizing the impeachment proceedings.

Bob Bird / AP Photo

Updated: July 11, 2018 at 4:44 p.m.

Just one day ahead of scheduled meetings on potential impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court justices, Justice Menis Ketchum has resigned.

West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals

As lawmakers discuss the possible impeachment of one or more West Virginia Supreme Court Justices, the rarity of the process raises questions about procedure, its history and other potential constitutional issues.

On Tuesday, June 26, West Virginia delegates passed House Resolution 201, stating: “Some or all of the five members of the Court may be guilty of maladministration, corruption, incompetency, gross immorality, or high crimes or misdemeanors, and may be unfit to serve as Chief Justice or as Justices of the West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals.”

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia lawmakers have begun the rare process of deciding whether impeachment proceedings are necessary just days after a state Supreme Court justice was charged in a 22-count criminal indictment.

The House Judiciary Committee met without taking action Tuesday. Earlier the House of Delegates voted to have the committee investigate any justice but decided against setting a deadline.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll hear from students, like Alex Bridges, who helped record 25 oral histories with people across West Virginia, as part of a summer folklore class. We’ll also hear the latest from the statehouse after Gov. Jim Justice issued a special session of the W.Va. Legislature on possible Supreme Court impeachments.

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