Richard Ojeda

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Sen. Richard Ojeda, D-7th, spoke to his colleagues on the Senate floor to announce his looming departure to focus on a run for the Democratic nomination for president in 2020. In a typically passionate tone, Ojeda criticized Republican leaders for failing to run bills he believes would have been helpful to all West Virginians.

“I’m sure everybody has heard quite a few rumors out there. I just wanted everybody to know there is truth to the rumor,” Ojeda said Thursday.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

This is a developing story and will be updated.

West Virginia state Senator Richard Ojeda says he will resign from his seat next week to focus on winning the Democratic nomination for president in 2020.  

John Raby

A West Virginia state senator and Army veteran who lost a bid for congress in the 2018 midterms now has his sights set on running for president in 2020.

Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Shortly after the teacher strike, Andrew Thomas stood before his fifth-grade social studies class at Mullens Middle School in Wyoming County, lowered the lights and showed his students a video of state Sen. Richard Ojeda. 

Richard Ojeda joined the Army because he says it seemed like the most reasonable choice he had growing up; his alternative options, he says, were to "dig coal" or "sell dope."

So he chose the Army, where he spent more than two decades. But when he came home to Logan County, W.Va., he was stunned.

"I come home from spending 24 years in the United States Army and I realize I got kids in my backyard that have it worse than the kids I saw in Iraq and Afghanistan," he shouts into the microphone during an interview.

Sen. Richard Ojeda, D-Logan, speaking on the Senate floor on March 10, 2018.
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A Twitter spat has broken out between the West Virginia Republican Party chairwoman and a Democratic candidate for Congress that ended up with her questioning him for collecting a military pension.

The disagreement started Wednesday night when Melody Potter criticized U.S. House 3rd District candidate Richard Ojeda (oh-JED'-ah) for engaging with "liberal buddy" Michael Moore. Potter called the meeting with the filmmaker "a slap in the face to every hardworking West Virginian."

Richard Ojeda
@ojeda4congress / Twitter

A West Virginia man has been sentenced to up to five years in prison for assaulting a state Senate candidate last year.

Jonathan Porter of Holden was sentenced Wednesday in Logan County Circuit Court in the May 2016 attack on Richard Ojeda.

Ibrahim.ID / wikimedia Commons

A 42-year-old West Virginia man has pleaded guilty to felony assault, admitting that last year he hit a state Senate candidate, who suffered broken bones to his face and was later elected.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports that Jonathan Porter of Holden entered the plea Wednesday.

Richard Ojeda
@ojeda4congress / Twitter

The trial for a man charged with attacking a then-state Senate candidate at a political cookout last year has been moved out of Logan County.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports a judge on Monday granted a request to move 42-year-old Jonathan Porter's trial to Kanawha County.

Richard Ojeda
@ojeda4congress / Twitter

West Virginia State Police say they've charged a man with attacking a state Senate candidate at a political cookout.

Senior Trooper J.E. Garren said Jonathan Porter is charged with malicious assault, attempted malicious assault and felony destruction of property in the beating on Sunday of Richard Ojeda, who's running as a Democrat for a state Senate seat.