Mountain Valley Pipeline

Wikimedia Commons

Federal regulators have halted construction of two major natural gas pipelines that cross through Appalachia this month, following several federal court decisions.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) halted the Atlantic Coast Pipeline on Friday, Aug. 10. The agency issued a similar stop-work order earlier this month for the 303-mile Mountain Valley Pipeline. Both orders followed decisions issued by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, a federal appeals court based in Richmond, Virginia.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we’ll visit a plantation owned by a villainized African-American woman, and we’ll hear the latest on halted construction of both the Atlantic Coast Pipeline and the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 photo, downed trees mark the route of the proposed Mountain Valley pipeline in Lindside, W.Va.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

Federal regulators have approved parts of the Mountain Valley Pipeline's plan to stabilize areas of the pipeline's route that are under construction and ensure that work already in progress does not become an environmental liability.

The document, mandated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission after it halted all construction of the 303-mile pipeline earlier this month, drew criticism from environmental groups that said the plan effectively greenlights continued pipeline construction.

Pipeline awaits construction.
SETH PERLMAN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Federal regulators have ordered all construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline to temporarily cease.

In a letter sent Friday, Aug. 3, by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to pipeline officials, the agency ordered construction to stop across the pipeline’s entire 303-mile route.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Moring, we hear a piece from our most recent episode of Inside Appalachia. The episode features one story about why pipeline protesters began scaling trees to block the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Brittany Patterson/ WVPB

Coal has dominated Appalachia’s energy economy for more than a century. But natural gas is emerging as a new economic force, bringing with it jobs, infrastructure needs and new environmental concerns.

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll hear why some are worried about the risk of water contamination from major gas pipelines being built through parts of West Virginia, projects which also promise jobs in the region.


West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, we take a sneak peek at a new West Virginia musical written by Mountain Stage host Larry Groce. One song features a governor working hard to please constituents. Hear about it on this West Virginia Morning.

The tree sitters with their treetop perch are nearly level with the ridge top. They sit near the site where boring will be used to cross underneath the Appalachian National Scenic Trail. A notice from Mountain Valley Pipeline is taped to the tree trunk.
Nancy Andrews

Environmental advocates yesterday asked federal regulators to suspend construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline (MVP).

 

Brittany Patterson / WVPB

The 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Thursday halted some construction of the natural gas Mountain Valley Pipeline in West Virginia.

The three-judge panel sided with conservation groups who challenged the pipeline’s water-crossings permit issued by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

The final two protesters who had perched themselves on trees and poles to block construction of a natural gas pipeline through Appalachia have come down.

The Roanoke Times reports one protester was forcibly removed Friday and another came down voluntarily as authorities approached.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

A citizen group says an environmental project manager for the government has been wrongly signing off on the construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Appalachians Against Pipelines

Protesters in Jefferson National Forest erected a new protest site today aimed at blocking construction of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

Fern MacDougal is the latest in a string of protesters to take to the trees in protest of the 303-mile pipeline.


Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

Following heavy rains, construction at a Mountain Valley Pipeline site in Virginia has been suspended until erosion control measures are established.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

The Mountain Valley Pipeline project has been cited for failing to control erosion at two work sites just two months after construction started on the more than 300-mile (483-kilometer) pipeline through Virginia and West Virginia.

In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 photo, beekeeper Constantine Chlepas sits on a section of downed trees on the route of the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline near his property in Lindside, W.Va.
Steve Helber / Associated Press

George Jones was against the Mountain Valley Pipeline from the start.

The natural gas pipeline is routed to run through the southwest Virginia farm his family has owned for seven generations. The 88-year-old Navy veteran never considered signing an easement agreement with the developers, because he thought the whole thing seemed an affront to his property rights. But state law meant he couldn’t even keep surveyors out.

Appalachians Against Pipelines

Anti-Mountain Valley Pipeline activists erected an aerial blockade in the middle of an access road in the Jefferson National Forest in Giles County, Virginia.

A pole planted in the middle of an access road is halting any progress on construction of a seven-mile road leading to the path of the Mountain Valley Pipeline. An activist perched on top of the 50-foot log displays a banner that reads “The Fire is Catching, No Pipelines.”

Eastern Panhandle Gas Pipeline, Mountaineer Gas, Protest, Pipeline
Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A judge has lifted the restraining order against natural gas pipeline protesters sitting in trees in West Virginia.

News outlets report Judge Robert Irons denied the injunction, reversing course less than two weeks after granting Mountain Valley Pipeline a 10-day restraining order against the protesters.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Since late February tree sitters have been perched in two trees atop Peters Mountain in Monroe County. They are so remote, few have seen or heard directly from the protestors, but still there’s plenty of people noticing. Nancy Andrews reports. 

And we’ll hear a preview of this week’s episode of Inside Appalachia, which explores the lessons of the recent W.Va. Teacher Strike.

Nancy Andrews

Since late February, a small group of people have been quietly perched in two trees atop Peters Mountain in Monroe County. They are so remote, few have seen or heard directly from the protesters, but still there’s plenty of people noticing.


Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

A temporary restraining order against natural gas pipeline protesters sitting in trees near the Virginia state line has been granted by a West Virginia judge.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A federal judge tells developers of the Mountain Valley Pipeline he won't order all landowners in its West Virginia lawsuit to respond by Dec. 4 to motions for summary judgment for rights of way available under federal regulations.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

Developers of a proposed natural gas pipeline are suing hundreds of landowners in two states to gain rights of way granted by federal regulations.

Mountain Valley Pipeline lawyers filed federal court complaints in Charleston, West Virginia and Roanoke, Virginia to obtain easements through eminent domain rights, The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported Thursday.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

West Virginia environmental regulators on Wednesday lifted their suspension of the permit for building the Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of the state.

The pipeline would extend south for 195 miles in north-central West Virginia through 11 counties to the Virginia state line and nearly 110 miles through six counties in that state.

Federal Regulators Approve Atlantic Coast, Mountain Valley Pipelines

Oct 13, 2017
Pipeline awaits construction.
SETH PERLMAN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

A divided panel of federal regulators granted approvals Friday evening for the Atlantic Coast and Mountain Valley natural gas pipelines, major East Coast projects.

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s authorization had been widely expected by both supporters and opponents of the pipelines. The certificates granted by the commission came with dozens of conditions, and other necessary permits for both projects are still pending.

Monroe County
David Benbennick / Wikimedia Commons

An earthquake that struck parts of Virginia and West Virginia appears to have left little to no damage.

The Roanoke Times reported Wednesday that the quake shook parts of the New River Valley shortly after 1:30 p.m. No damage was immediately reported.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

West Virginia environmental regulators are rescinding approval for building the Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

In a letter Thursday, the Department of Environmental Protection said it's vacating the water quality certification issued in March, which followed review of the projected impact on the state's waters and public hearings.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

A lawsuit filed Thursday is challenging the company that wants to build a 300-mile pipeline through West Virginia and Virginia, and the federal agency that oversees it.

West Virginia Gov. Jim Justice talks about his budget proposal during a stop on his Save Our State Tour on Thursday, March 3, 2017, at Fairmont State University.
Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The Justice administration has refused to schedule a hearing on an appeal of the Mountain Valley Pipeline's authorization.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports Department of Environmental Protection Secretary Austin Caperton signed a letter last week denying a request for a hearing challenging the DEP's approval of a Clean Water Act certification for the MVP. The letter was sent to Appalachia Mountain Advocates, an environmental law firm that challenged the authorization.

Mountain Valley Pipeline, LLC

West Virginia environmental authorities have issued a water quality certification for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

The certification required by the Federal Clean Water Act concerns impact on West Virginia waters.

The Department of Environmental Protection says project impacts will require the builder to purchase credits to be used to improve streams and wetlands around the state.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

West Virginia residents were divided during the final state public hearing on the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

Several urged state permit approvals for the project and its jobs. Some others at the Thursday hearing warned of damage from construction, erosion and the aerial herbicide spraying along the right of way that would continue perpetually.

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