Inside Appalachia

West Virginia lawmakers are looking into ways to prevent another chemical spill.

Some Pennsylvania resident face paying a ‘rain tax'.

A telescope in danger of closing is still making ‘far out’ discoveries.

And a West Virginia community is fixing its own water problems.

Brian Allen / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Kentucky prepares to introduce new science education standards.

A report on the effects of natural gas fracking is due out soon.

And we hear from two West Virginia writers with books out just in time for the spooky season.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Stories and photographs from the Cacapon and Lost River Valley are featured in a book just released by West Virginia University Press.

Listening to the Land features the stories of several owners throughout the watershed who have chosen to preserve their land through the Cacapon and Lost River Land Trust.

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A new Kentucky café caters to Alzheimer’s patients and their families.

Arts and Culture provide economic development in one Kentucky county.

A new book profiles one of West Virginia’s most picturesque river valleys.

And ink lovers turn out for the first WV tattoo expo.

Submitted Photo

Compressed natural gas is a hard sell despite all the drilling.

West Virginia native John Nash continues to inspire.

Traditional music lovers will soon be able to own The 1928 Johnson City Sessions.

And we take a trip to the quiet zone in West Virginia, shhhh.

Rt 219 Project

One of the most immediate effects of the federal government shutdown hits tourists.

A record number of raptors flew over an observation point in West Virginia recently.

A story teller puts a new twist on old Appalachian traditions.

And a Kentucky school program helps who want to children learn music.

States are getting ready for Obamacare.

One of this year’s Inspiring West Virginians is a businesswoman from Morgantown.

Kentucky’s Poet Laureate talks about his work and diversity in Appalachia.

And we visit a school in North Carolina where the Cherokee language is taught.

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