Delegate Isaac Sponaugle

Office of Gov. Jim Justice / via Twitter

A Democratic West Virginia lawmaker has refiled a legal challenge of Republican Gov. Jim Justice's residency.

News outlets report Delegate Isaac Sponaugle of Pendleton filed a petition Tuesday for writ of mandamus against Justice, asking the court to require the governor to live at the seat of government, as the West Virginia Constitution and state code require.

Jim Justice
Walter Scriptunas II / AP Photo

A Kanawha County Circuit Court Judge asked for more information Monday on motions in a lawsuit that seeks to compel Gov. Jim Justice to reside in Charleston.

 

Isaac Sponaugle, a Democratic member of the House of Delegates, filed a lawsuit in June to compel Gov. Justice to meet a state constitutional requirement that he reside in the state capital of Charleston.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A member of the West Virginia House of Delegates has filed suit against Gov. Jim Justice over a provision in the state constitution requiring the governor to reside in the state capital.

Del. Isaac Sponaugle, a Democrat, filed a complaint in Kanawha County Circuit Court stating that Gov. Justice has not lived in Charleston or conducted the business of his office in the state’s capital.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Members of the House of Delegates are still debating a bill that would take money from the Rainy Day Fund to balance the 2016 budget, but it’s a fight over PEIA, the public employee’s health insurance program, that’s stalling the crucial legislation.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

On the House floor Friday, Delegates were set to consider a bill recently approved by the Senate - a bill to help balance the 2016 budget. Senate Bill 364 was on second reading until members of the GOP majority made a tactical move to block a Democratic amendment.

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

The House Government Organization Committee approved a bill Wednesday that would repeal the state’s prevailing wage - the hourly wage rate and benefits workers are paid on state construction projects. The bill hasn’t had its first reading on the floor yet, but House Democrats are still trying to slow it down.