Debate

Cecelia Mason / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The U.S. Senate campaign of Republican Patrick Morrisey says he has accepted an invitation to debate incumbent Democrat Joe Manchin on Nov. 1.

On The Legislature Today, we bring you another reporter roundtable where we discuss some of the biggest issues from the week. Host Andrea Lannom is joined by reporters Jake Zuckerman of the Charleston Gazette-Mail and Brad McElhinny of West Virginia MetroNews.

Patricia Rucker
Will Price / West Virginia Legislative Photography

A bill to prohibit any Common Core-based education standards from being taught in West Virginia classrooms was taken up in the Senate’s Education committee Saturday. The standards have been debated for years at the statehouse and now lawmakers are looking at legislation that specifies what can be taught.

Pipeline ready for construction.
Seth Perlman / Associated Press

West Virginia residents were divided during the final state public hearing on the proposed Mountain Valley Pipeline, which would carry natural gas down the center of West Virginia for 195 miles.

Several urged state permit approvals for the project and its jobs. Some others at the Thursday hearing warned of damage from construction, erosion and the aerial herbicide spraying along the right of way that would continue perpetually.

Perry Bennet / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Democrats in the House of Delegates Thursday attempted to change the scheduling classification of marijuana so it could be prescribed by doctors.

House Bill 2526 focuses on adding drugs to the state’s scheduling system, a classification of both prescription and illicit drugs. These classifications are referred to as Schedule I, II, IV, and V.

Monday night marked the first presidential debate of the 2016 election cycle. Democrat Hillary Clinton joined Republican Donald Trump on the same stage for the first time, and the same is about to happen in a West Virginia.

Tuesday, Republican Bill Cole and Democrat Jim Justice will meet in Charleston for their first of two televised debates focused on the top issues facing West Virginia- a struggling economy, a high unemployment rate, and a less than effective education system, just to name a few.

Bill Cole sat down to discuss his debate preparations and his focus this election cycle- jobs.

At their second televised forum in three days, two of the three Democratic candidates for Governor continued their push to convince the voters of West Virginia to cast ballots in their favor during the upcoming primary election. 

PBS

PBS NewsHour will produce the first Democratic presidential candidates debate (following the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary) on Thursday, February 11. Watch it along with West Virginia Public Broadcasting at our #DemDebate Watch Party!

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Two bills that both died on the final night of the 2015 legislative session, resurfaced Monday during interim meetings - forced pooling and public charter schools. Both ideas erupted in debate in 2015, but Monday’s discussions were calm and reflective – but not without some concerns.

The separate discussions Monday on forced pooling and charter schools were mostly on how to make these controversial pieces of legislation work for lawmakers and interested parties on both sides of the issues.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The House passed Senate Bill 357 Friday, the Coal Jobs and Safety Act of 2015. This bill has caused a lot of controversy, so it was no surprise when the House debated the bill for two hours. Republicans feel like the bill is an update to previous safety laws, while some Democrats feel like it’s a scale back.

Liz McCormick / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Delegates approved six pieces of legislation Wednesday including a Senate bill that allows emergency responders, doctors, and family members to administer a drug to reverse the effects of an overdose. But it was House Bill 2568, the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act that got the most discussion on the floor before it was ultimately approved.

West Virginia Legislative Services

Coal mine safety was on the minds of Democrats in the house Tuesday; that issue was House Bill 2011, dealing with deliberate intent.  The measure doesn’t address mine safety standards, but those opposed to the bill said it will hurt miners.

Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

For years, Republicans have called for nonpartisan election of Supreme Court Justices. But the Democrats never put the issue on the agenda. Now having taken control of the House, Republicans finally got their wish.

Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

At the end of every floor session, senators and delegates are allowed to give remarks to the entire body.  In the House Thursday, these remarks led to extended debate about jobs in the north and the lack of them in the south; about drug addiction and education, and the debate lasted for nearly an hour.

Ashton Marra / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

The two candidates for West Virginia's 3rd Congressional District squared off in their only scheduled debate Tuesday evening in Huntington. The event was sponsored by the Huntington Herald-Dispatch.

Republican state Senator Evan Jenkins came out swinging, immediately attacking Democratic Congressman Nick Rahall in his opening remarks for his party connections, calling him a "foot solider" for President Obama and former House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. 

West Virginia Public Broadcasting is hosting a second debate for the candidates running for U.S. Senate and wants to know, what do you want to hear from them?

Submit your questions to us by the morning of Thursday, October 16, and we'll choose some to ask the candidates Friday morning.

The debate itself will air Friday evening from 7-8pm on West Virginia Public Broadcasting and West Virginia Public Radio. All of the candidates on the ballot have been invited to participate.