comedy

Culture Clash
Eric Schwabel

Back in the 1990s, Trey got into Culture Clash, a trio of Latino comedians who do social satire. He loved that they skewered public figures and poke sacred cows.

Culture Clash enjoys making the audience squirm, no matter what part of the political spectrum they're on. Their critically acclaimed work in the 90s had to do with tension along the U.S-Mexico border.

Recently, they’ve been reviving and updating their pieces because – if you haven’t heard – news from the border is pretty relevant these days.

courtesy Suzi Whaples

The election is over. So this week, we thought it was only fitting to share a few stories, tall tales, and flat out lies— without the political pressure.

After all, here in Appalachia we have a rich cultural tradition of storytelling.

In this episode, we listen to three storytellers from the West Virginia Storyteller’s Guild, all of whom have competed and won prizes across the country.

Tina Fey
PRX

Host Tina Fey, star of 30 Rock, author of Bossypants and Saturday Night Live alumna, takes listeners around the world into the secret life of girls—from the dunes of the Sahara to a slumber party in Manhattan, from the dancehalls of Jamaica to a racetrack in Ramallah—and reveals some of her own hidden worlds.

Tune in to The Hidden World of Girls on West Virginia Public Radio on Thursday, March 27 at 9 p.m.

Oh, the Hipsters Lie!

Jan 14, 2014
WikiCommons

Music snobbery comes in many forms, but it operates under two basic principles.

The first is that a hipster assumes that they know about bands you couldn't possible know about and therefore you are much less hip than they. Secondly, once everyone knows about a band, their music or their "hipness," is no longer viable as they have "gone commercial."

Jimmy Kimmel has done a social experiment. When a camera and a mic are present, what will they say when asked about fictional bands?

The result is a scream: