Charlie McCoy

courtesy Charlie McCoy

In this episode of Inside Appalachia, we’ll talk about faith and music. We learn about Sister Rosetta Tharpe, one of the first great recording stars of gospel music, find out the story behind "Amazing Grace," and why it became an American icon, and hear the story of Nashville session musician, W.Va. native Charlie McCoy.


Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage

Poet, performer, visual artist and rock-and-roll icon Patti Smith joins us on this week's broadcast.

Here she performs "People Have The Power," the driving anthem co-written with her husband Fred "Sonic" Smith, a native of Lincoln County, WV who was posthumously inducted into the WV Music Hall of Fame the evening prior to this performance.

This Sunday you can watch along live as Mountain Stage hosts a sold-out show at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, WV featuring Patti Smith & Family, Mollie O’Brien & Rich Moore, Van William, Robbie Fulks and a special tribute to Little Jimmy Dickens featuring Tim O’Brien, Charlie McCoy and Friends.

courtesy Charlie McCoy

Even if you don’t recognize the name Charlie McCoy, you’ve probably heard his music. Many of the great musicians who recorded in Nashville over the past fifty years have played with McCoy, a native of West Virginia who’s been working in the Nashville music industry for over five decades. He’s recorded with some of the best known country music and rock and roll legends, including Elvis Presley, Roy Orbison, Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash, and George Jones. Charlie McCoy's new memoir is called 50 Cents and a Box Top

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Experts and advocates gathered in Morgantown yesterday to talk about policy issues related to children’s health care. As Kara Lofton reports, most of the conversation was centered around the Children’s Health Insurance Program -- also known as CHIP.

EMILY SARKEES

There’s no place in America that’s gained a bigger reputation for country and rock and roll music than Nashville, Tennessee. So what does it take to make it there? Well, perhaps having West Virginia roots might help. There are so many talented musicians from our region who’ve found success in Nashville that some refer to the scene as the “WV music mafia.” But what about the folks who stay here in the Mountain State? What does it take to “make it” in the current music scene here?