Charleston

October 26, 1934: Basketball Star Rod Hundley Born in Charleston

Oct 26, 2017
Hot Rod Hundley
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia / West Virginia & Regional History Collection

Basketball star Rod Hundley was born in Charleston on October 26, 1934. He was a sensation at Charleston High School, dazzling opponents with his tricks and talent. His flashy style is rarely seen today, outside of the Harlem Globetrotters.

His repertoire included trick shots, a signature behind-the-back dribble, and spinning the ball on his finger—all during games. His flair on the court earned him the nickname the “clown prince of basketball.” But he’ll always be remembered as “Hot Rod.”

American Friends Service Committee South Region

High-profile confrontations between African-Americans and police officers have fueled tensions across the country. West Virginia is NOT a place where people are comfortable talking about these things.

But in Trey's hometown of Charleston, some of the key players are now bringing this tension out into the open.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Trey Kay, host of West Virginia Public Broadcasting’s Us & Them podcast, has been working on a series of reports focusing on Charleston’s West Side. His most recent installment explores a new program that awards grants to Charleston Police officers willing to purchase and rehab dilapidated West Side homes, and live there. On this West Virginia Morning, we hear an excerpt from the podcast episode titled “A Policeman is a Person in Your Neighborhood.”


Trey Kay

Two rivers run through Charleston, West Virginia. While most of the city is situated on the Kanawha, it’s the Elk River that demarcates the West Side from the governmental and business center of Charleston. Today, the West Side is the poorest neighborhood in Charleston.

Staff Sgt. Tony R. Tolley / U.S. Air Force

The West Virginia Air National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing has sent a transport plane and crew from Charleston to support relief efforts in storm-damaged Puerto Rico.

According to the Air National Guard, the C-130 Hercules plane is transporting equipment from New York to Georgia before departing for the Caribbean island on Thursday.

Charleston
Edsel Little / Flickr

BB&T has announced it is cutting 56 jobs from its processing service center in West Virginia's capital city.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports the financial services company announced on Tuesday the layoffs will come from a company center in Charleston that focuses on operations such as the processing of loans, credit cards and mortgages.

Kenneth King Collection, West Virginia State Archives

The "Us & Them" podcast is about seeing the same story two ways… and nothing calls out for that treatment more than coal in West Virginia.

Joni Deutsch

In most schools, you're likely to find yourself labeled as a jock, theater geek, stoner or even a loner.

But at my alma mater in West Virginia, we had a unique "Us & Them" sorting classification: you were either a “hiller” or a “creeker.”

Greg Goebel / commons.wikimedia.org

Federal funding has been awarded to two airport authorities in West Virginia. U.S. Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and Joe Manchin made the announcement Friday.

Over $730,000 will be awarded to the Mingo County Airport Authority in Williamson and to the Central West Virginia Regional Airport Authority in Charleston.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

On August 11, 1958, the Congress of Racial Equality—or CORE—launched a sit-in movement at several Charleston lunch counters. Prior to this time, African-Americans in Charleston could order takeout food at many white-owned diners but were not allowed to sit down and eat.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

In a referendum on August 7, 1877, West Virginia voters chose Charleston to be the permanent state capital. The capital’s location had become a running joke, as government records had been moved from Wheeling to Charleston and then back to Wheeling again, all in 14 years.The capital was on the move so much on West Virginia riverboats, it earned the nickname of “the floating capital.”

Kanawha River
Acroterion / wikimedia commons

The Environmental Protection Agency has announced an agreement to address dioxin contamination in the Kanawha River by constructing a cap over nine acres of sediment containing the toxic substance.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On the West Virginia Morning, in 2016, about 15 thousand people were killed by gun violence in the U.S. About 3 thousand teenagers were either injured or killed. In Charleston, West Virginia, there were 11 murders in 2016 -- eight of them occurred on the West Side of town and many of them were teens.

Historian and Businessman J.P. Hale
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

Historian, physician, and businessman John P. Hale died on July 11, 1902, at age 78. The great-grandson of the legendary Mary Draper Ingles, Hale was born in present Virginia before moving to the Kanawha Valley in 1840.

He earned a medical degree but decided that medicine wasn’t as lucrative as the booming salt business. By 1860, his salt works, located between Charleston and Malden, was possibly the largest in North America.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

On June 30, 1904, the Kelly Axe and Tool Company acquired 53 acres of land along the Kanawha River on the West End of Charleston. It eventually became home to the world’s largest axe factory.

The company was founded in 1874 by William C. Kelly, who established his first factory in Kentucky before relocating to Indiana and then West Virginia. Kelly was attracted to the Kanawha Valley by the availability of abundant natural gas and good access to river and rail transportation.

This Week in West Virginia History.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online.

Bishop Matthew Wesley Clair Sr. died in Covington, Kentucky, on June 28, 1943, at age 77. He was born in Monroe County to former slaves just months after the Civil War ended.

His family moved to Charleston, where Clair joined Simpson Methodist Episcopal Church. He graduated from college in 1889 and began a four-stint leading the Methodist Episcopal Church in Harpers Ferry.

A topless protest is planned in West Virginia's capital city despite the mayor's request to reschedule.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports nearly 200 people have RSVP'd for "Free the Nip Top Freedom Rally" on Facebook. Charleston Mayor Danny Jones asked organizers on Wednesday to protest another day, accusing them of "seeking to parade naked in front of young children," as local arts nonprofit FestivALL has several kids' events planned also on Saturday.

The Oberports

"When we get on stage, I feel like that’s where we’re supposed to be… that’s what we’re supposed to be doing."

An independent candidate has announced he is running for mayor of West Virginia's capital city.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reported on Sunday that Andrew "Andy" Backus filed for precandidacy in Charleston's 2018 mayoral race. State code requires possible candidates for public office to register a committee to accept campaign contributions, and through that process the Committee to Elect Andy Backus was filed.

Burns Exposures

"People want something tangible, something they can hold, something of substance. This is one of vinyl's greatest strengths."

Joel Prince

"I want to help push all music, be a part of all music. I never want to be in a box."

Morgantown
Jae120163 / wikimedia commons

Looking for an internship in the state of West Virginia? One website says you can find them in Morgantown or Charleston.

GoodCall.com ranked Morgantown first and Charleston twenty-first on a list of the top cities with summer internships in the U.S. It’s part of the 2017 Best Cities for Summer Internships report compiled by the consumer research site.

E-WV / West Virginia Humanities Council

Author Henry William Hoffman was born in Charleston on May 16, 1925. After his father left the family in the early 1930s, William and his only sibling, Janet, were raised primarily by a domineering but much loved grandmother. A staunch Presbyterian, Hoffman’s fiction was influenced by his religious upbringing and his studies at Hampden-Sydney College.

Charleston attorney and former state delegate Rusty Webb has resigned from the Charleston City Council less than four months after being appointed.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports Webb decided to step down on Tuesday. He was a representative for the city's 17th Ward, which encompasses most of Kanawha City.

President Edwin Welch
ucwv.edu

University of Charleston President Edwin H. Welch has announced his retirement, effective in June 2018.

Welch has been president of the school since 1989, when it had 736 full-time students. Last fall, full-time enrollment reached a record 1,848.

Cecelia Mason / WV Public Radio

The National Weather Service says last month was the warmest April on record in several West Virginia cities.

The weather service says Beckley, Clarksburg, Elkins and Parkersburg all set records for the average temperature during the month, while Charleston and Huntington each had their second-warmest Aprils on record.

May 4, 1896: Children’s Home Society of West Virginia Founded in Charleston

May 4, 2017
Children's Home Society of West Virginia
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On May 4, 1896, the Children’s Home Society of West Virginia was founded in Charleston. The Society was part of a national movement to place orphaned and neglected children with caring families, rather than crowding them into county poorhouses, where children often lived in squalor, with conditions resembling a Dickens novel.

Highway Marker
E-WV / WV Humanities Council

On April 26, 1937, West Virginia’s first highway historical marker was installed in Charleston, detailing the history of our state capitol.

In that first year, 440 sites were marked by these white aluminum signs, which feature a circular state seal at the top. Initial funding was provided by one of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal programs.

Charleston Homeless Encampment
wchstv

The issue of homelessness in Charleston has become evident to residents and the city's leaders say they are struggling to solve it.

The Charleston Gazette-Mail reports Mayor Danny Jones said Charleston is a mecca for people who have "taken over our streets." His comments came during a recent city council finance meeting and he has continued to discuss the topic on his local radio show.

e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia

Civil rights leader Leon Sullivan died on April 24, 2001, at age 78. The Charleston native graduated from Garnet High School and West Virginia State College before being trained in the ministry at Union Theological Seminary and Columbia University. In 1950, he became minister of Philadelphia’s Zion Baptist Church. During his 38 years at Zion Baptist, the church grew into one of the nation’s largest congregations.

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