Planet Money

Imagine you could call up a friend and say, "Meet me at the bar and tell me what's going on with the economy." Now imagine that's actually a fun evening. That's what we're going for at Planet Money.

We try really hard every episode to find creative, entertaining ways to make sense of the big, complicated forces that move our economy. That's why we made a t-shirt and traced the supply chain around the world from cotton field to factory; bought 100 barrels of crude oil and followed it from ground to gas tank; launched a satellite; and built an adorable algorithmic trading Twitter bot.

Planet Money launched in 2008 during the financial crisis and, since then, it has won many awards including a Peabody and an Edward R. Murrow Award in 2017 for our investigation into Wells Fargo's retaliation against whistle-blowers.

In 2017, we launched The Indicator, a shorter, more frequent podcast that takes a number or a term from the news and finds context and big ideas behind it.

You can also hear Planet Money stories on Morning Edition, All Things Considered.

Planet Money and The Indicator are co-hosted by: Ailsa ChangCardiff GarciaJacob GoldsteinNoel KingKenny MaloneRobert Smith, and Stacey Vanek Smith.

China's social credit score is a lot like a credit score in the U.S., but with a twist. In China, your ability to participate fully in the economy is dependent not just on your borrowing history, but also your behavior. How you act at work, what you buy in the store and whether you obey traffic laws can all factor into your score.

The Chinese government is currently piloting this program in several cities. Today on the Indicator, we look at life in one of the pilot cities and see what life might look like in China if this system is adopted nationwide.

Life On China's Blacklist

Oct 10, 2018

In America, default and bankruptcy is almost a rite of passage for people in business. It's certainly nothing to be ashamed of. In China, however, failure to pay your debts is a cardinal sin. Offenders are banished to a blacklist. If you're on the blacklist, you can't buy a plane ticket or stay in many hotels. And your face may be plastered on billboards throughout the city, naming you as untrustworthy. Today on the Indicator, we talk with a coal broker who has been on the list for more than two years.