How the Farmington Mine Tragedy Changed a Community and Pushed for Safety Reform

Dec 14, 2018

On this West Virginia Morning, journalist and professor Bonnie Stewart joins us to talk about the recent 50th anniversary of the Farmington Mine Disaster.

Credit West Virginia Public Broadcasting

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This week’s episode of Inside Appalachia honors the 78 men killed in the Farmington Mine Disaster 50 years ago last month. Molly Born sat down with journalist and professor Bonnie Stewart to discuss the significance of the tragedy that forever changed a community -- and led to mine safety and health reforms. Stewart's book "No. 9: The 1968 Farmington Mine Disaster" was published in 2012.

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West Virginia Morning is produced with help from Molly Born, Jessica Lilly, Kara Lofton, Liz McCormick, Dave Mistich, Brittany Patterson and Roxy Todd.

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