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West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

You might’ve heard Trey Kay, host of WVPB’s podcast Us & Them engage in a conversation during the past several weeks, in a series called “Red State Blue State”,  about the culture differences between West Virginia and southern California. In the latest episode of Us & Them, Trey finds kindred spirits in a trio of Latino comedians who call themselves "Culture Clash". Just like Trey, these comedians explore the space between cultural divides. We hear an excerpt of that episode on this West Virginia Morning.

December 12, 1975: Original Shoney's in Charleston Closes

Dec 12, 2018
Shoneys
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online

On December 12, 1975, the original Shoney’s Restaurant closed down for good in Charleston. The Shoney’s chain grew from the original Parkette Drive-In and Bowling Alley, which had opened on the city’s West Side in 1947.

The restaurant was the brainchild of Alex Schoenbaum, a former All-American football player at Ohio State. He moved to Charleston in 1943 and opened the Parkette four years later.

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The West Virginia Autism Training Center based at Marshall University has expanded its programs to Shepherd.

Shepherd joins Concord University as the second campus-based satellite site for Marshall’s autism services program.

Palosirkka / wikimedia Commons

A West Virginia judge has agreed to stop presiding over marriages altogether rather than officiate for same-sex couples.

The West Virginia Judicial Investigation Commission issued a warning to Mineral County Judge Lynn Nelson after receiving a complaint from Fairness West Virginia, which advocates for equal treatment of people regardless of their gender or sexual orientation.

Workers are removing water and pumping fresh air into a nonoperational coal mine in West Virginia as they search for three people stuck inside.

Ted S. Warrem / AP Photo

A federal prosecutor will hold a symposium on marijuana Wednesday in Charleston. The invitation-only event will feature law enforcement officials and researchers opposed to marijuana legalization.

Mike Stuart, the U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of West Virginia, is hosting the event alongside a regional task force aimed at curbing drug trafficking. 

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, the petrochemical industry is promising economic development in many Ohio Valley towns where it’s sorely needed. Like East Liverpool, Ohio, near the Pennsylvania border. There, The Allegheny Front’s Julie Grant reports, the town’s welcoming this new industry while still living with pollution from decades-old facilities.

December 11, 1905: Filmmaker Pare Lorentz Born

Dec 11, 2018
During World War II, Lorentz made hundreds of training films for pilots who were flying previously uncharted routes around the world.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

Filmmaker “Pare” Lorentz was born in Clarksburg on December 11, 1905. After attending West Virginia Wesleyan College for a year, he transferred to West Virginia University, where he wrote stories for West Virginia Moonshine magazine. At the age of 20, he moved to New York City and began writing for some of the nation’s most popular magazines.

Elementary Classroom
Douglaspperkins / Wikimedia Commons

The West Virginia School Building Authority has voted to fund more than $72 million in facilities projects statewide.

Monday's vote includes construction and renovation projects for public school systems in 19 counties.

Kara Lofton / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A state audit says West Virginia's Department of Homeland Security and Emergency Management didn't comply with federal regulations, forcing localities to pay for disaster relief.

BridgeValley Community and Technical College is one of nine CTCs in West Virginia.
Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

A bill West Virginia Public Broadcasting followed closely during the 2018 regular state Legislative session could resurface in 2019 – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a Community and Technical College. Last year, it was often referred to as the "free community and technical college bill," and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

Pipeline awaits construction.
SETH PERLMAN / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Atlantic Coast Pipeline developer Dominion Energy stopped construction Friday along the multi-billion dollar natural gas pipeline's entire 600-mile route.

In a letter to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, Dominion said it was halting construction following a Friday decision from the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Digging For Answers: New Report Points To Industry Obfuscation Of Mining’s Health Effects

Dec 10, 2018
Sydney Boles / Ohio Valley ReSource

Jason Walker spends $50 per month on bottled water. He spends three hours each week standing by the small stream that runs near his house, pumping creek water into a thousand-gallon tank.

“You have to catch the creek at the right time, when it’s clear,” Walker said. “Whatever you pump, whatever the creek looks like, is what you’re going to pump, and that’s going to pump right into your house.”

Walker, 31, used to get water from a well he shared with his mother, Sherry Walker, who lives next door. But they noticed changes after mountaintop removal mining started nearby.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a growing body of research shows that people living near mountaintop removal coal mines face increased risks of disease linked to pollutants in air and water.

A new report from a human rights group argues that the mining industry has tried to suppress the science about health risks and has forced coalfield communities to take on the industry’s costs.

Ohio Valley ReSource reporter Sydney Boles visited residents who are hoping for clear answers and clean water.

December 10, 1844: Clergyman William "Uncle" Dyke Garrett Born

Dec 10, 2018
 SharePrint Uncle Dyke Garrett
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online & Lillian Porter Smith

Clergyman William Dyke Garrett was born on December 10, 1844. Known affectionately as “Uncle Dyke,” Garrett was a legendary figure in Logan County history. At the beginning of the Civil War, he enlisted in the Confederate Logan Wildcats regiment. Being deaf in one ear, he wasn’t forced to fight. Instead, he was named chaplain of the unit.

West Virginia House Majority Leader Daryl Cowles, R-Morgan, studies legislation in a House Finance Committee meeting in 2017.
Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

West Virginia lawmakers in the Eastern Panhandle have a long list of issues they hope to tackle in the upcoming state Legislative session, including reintroducing a controversial bill to allow eligible people to carry guns on college campuses.

'Who's Going to Pay for It?': No Easy Answers to Resolve Water Issues

Dec 7, 2018
F. Brian Ferguson / Charleston Gazette-Mail

BRADSHAW -- Local officials in McDowell County called a meeting in the town of Bradshaw to talk about broadband internet in West Virginia’s poorest county. But the first question from a resident focused on something more basic.

“Eleven years ago someone knocked on my door and promised me I could get city water. I still don’t have any city water, and I’ve never heard from them since -- not once,” Sandra Roberts said. “Will you be like that? When is the next time we’re going to see you all out this way?”

Search for Central Water System Proves Futile For One Family

Dec 7, 2018
Craig Hudson / Charleston Gazette-Mail

BRANCHLAND -- In Southern West Virginia, reliable access to clean water doesn’t just mean getting what you pay for. Sometimes, you don’t have the opportunity to pay for it.

Allen Adkins has been trying for years to get water lines extended to his Lincoln County home. Without that, he and his family are left to depend on a set of wells that leaves them uncertain how long water will last each day.

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A new study from the West Virginia University School of Nursing suggests that loneliness may be making it harder for middle-aged Appalachians to manage chronic health conditions.

The study looked at 90 Appalachians ages 45-64, each with at least one chronic illness, such as diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. Using surveys, researchers tracked how lonely or socially supported participants were and then measured levels of anger, depression and how those related to their physical and mental health.

In Southern W.Va, Days Without Water Are a Way Of Life

Dec 7, 2018
F. Brian Ferguson / Charleston Gazette-Mail

GARY -- Each morning Tina Coleman turns her faucet, she waits to see what color the water will be when, or if, it flows out.

Some days it’s blue or green -- earthy tones that could be comforting in a river bed surrounded by trees, instead of filling the porcelain tub she uses to bathe her 9-month-old grandson. Other days, the water looks like different shades of rust: deep, coppery reds and browns. Sometimes it’s white and cloudy, as if a powder, thoroughly stirred, is about to dissolve.

Alex Slitz / Lexington Herald-Leader

HARLAN, Ky. -- David Wilburn stood in the kitchen of his Harlan County home and filled a gallon jug from the faucet and held it up to the light.

“It might be clear right now, but that’s just until they have another leak,” Wilburn said as he looked for any discoloration or sediments floating to the bottom.

When service lines break near his home, Wilburn said the tap water can be muddy for days at a time. Those periods have left him questioning the quality of his water, which he doesn’t even like to use for bathing.

Alex Slitz / Lexington Herald_leader

Jimmy Kerr sat in his real estate office near Pikeville and talked of a looming crisis in Eastern Kentucky.

Kerr is treasurer of the Martin County Water District, a utility that’s made national news amid reports of poor water quality and long outages that have left hundreds of families without running water for days at a time.

Many in Eastern Kentucky Can’t Count on Clean Water. Here are 5 Ways to Fix That.

Dec 7, 2018
Alex Slitz / Lexington Herald-Leader

Everyone deserves reliable access to clean water for drinking, cooking and washing, but that’s often not the case in mountainous Eastern Kentucky.

As the Herald-Leader reported this series, Stirring the Waters, in recent months, we spoke with dozens of residents, industry experts, state regulators and local officials about how to improve this fundamental, life-sustaining service in Appalachian Kentucky. These are their suggestions.

Will Wright / Lexington Herald-Leader

HUNTLEYVILLE, Ky.-- Jessica and Tim Taylor’s prayers seem to have paid off.

The rain came. It filled the buckets that lined the outside of their home. It filled the small plastic pool by the barn they use to water the animals. But not knowing how long the rain will continue makes them anxious.

“It’s beyond stressful,” Jessica Taylor said.

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A new study has found that cardiology patients with opioid use disorders have more complications, longer hospital stays and costlier surgeries.

The study looked at 5.7 million patients who underwent cardiac surgery and compared outcomes of those who had opioid use disorders and those who didn’t. While there wasn’t a significant difference the rate of death between the two groups, patients with opioid use disorders had more complications, longer length of stay in the hospital and higher costs.

SHAYLA KLEIN

This week on Inside Appalachia, we take another look at the world of independent pro-wrestling.

While pro-wrestling is popular across the country and all around the world, the sport has a rich and storied history here in Appalachia. In this episode we’ll take a glimpse at the action, intensity, and drama (real-life and otherwise) that happens between the ropes.

West Virginia Morning
West Virginia Public Broadcasting

On this West Virginia Morning, a bill we followed closely during the 2018 legislative session could resurface in the 2019 session – legislation that would offer tuition assistance to in-state students attending a community and technical college. It was often referred to as the free community and technical college bill, and it would’ve provided the “last dollar in” after all other forms of financial aid had been exhausted.

December 7, 1941: Japan Launches a Surprise Attack on Pearl Harbor

Dec 7, 2018
Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack
Wikimedia commons / Official U.S. Navy Photograph NH 50930

In the early morning hours of December 7, 1941, Japan launched a surprise attack on the U.S. naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The raid killed more than 2,400 Americans and prompted the United States to enter World War II.  Torpedoes and bombs sank four U.S. battleships, including the USS West Virginia, which lost two officers and 103 crew members.

Manchin Changes Mind on GOP-Confirmed Trump Energy Nominee

Dec 6, 2018
Joe Manchin
Jesse Wright / WV Public Broadcasting

The Senate has confirmed President Donald Trump’s nominee for a federal energy board despite a video that shows the nominee saying renewable energy “screws up” the nation’s electrical grid.

The Republican-controlled Senate approved Bernard McNamee’s nomination to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on a 50-49 party-line vote Thursday, Dec. 6.

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A West Virginia county prosecutor says the FBI has opened an investigation into a traffic stop involving two state police troopers and a sheriff's deputy in which a teenage motorist allegedly was beaten.

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