Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

‘Clean’ Pay Raise Bill Zips Through House Finance, Heads to Floor

Updated Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 6:05 p.m. With the omnibus education bill effectively dead, the House of Delegates has turned its attention to providing pay raises for state employees, including teachers, service personnel and state police. The lower chamber’s Finance Committee cleared a bill Wednesday that would do just that.

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Wild Wondering West Virginia

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WVPB Podcasts & Programs

Caitlin Tan / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Appalachia’s Folkways: Handmade and Passing It On

This week on Inside Appalachia, we’ll hear from Appalachians who have a knack for making things with their hands -- people who make the essentials of life in the old ways. “And when I sit down at one of those looms and I start creating a piece of cloth, I feel connected to the place of my ancestors, the people who have come before,” said weaver Jane Gilchrest.

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W.Va. Tourism event at the West Virginia Capitol on Nov. 14, 2018 celebrating the launch of Fallout 76.
Daniel Walker / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

Tourism Day was recognized by the West Virginia Legislature this week. In light of that, we bring you a report on a video game that tourism officials believe makes a positive impact in bringing visitors to West Virginia. By now, you may have heard of Fallout 76 - the latest in the popular line of Fallout video games. It was released last fall with much fanfare by Gov. Jim Justice and the West Virginia Division of Tourism. West Virginia Public Broadcasting spoke with a local gamer, and we bring you this special look inside the video game.

Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage / mountain stage

Ranky Tanky are a South Carolina based band that specializes in "Gullah" music- a style born out of the coastal region and influenced by West African traditions. Here's the band's take on the American folk song, "O Death," for our Mountain Stage Song of the Week.

February 21, 1913: Legislature Passes Workers' Compensation System

1 hour ago
This Week in West Virginia History is a co-production of West Virginia Public Broadcasting and the West Virginia Humanities Council.
e-wv, The West Virginia Encyclopedia online. / e-WV

On February 21, 1913, the legislature passed an act creating a workers’ compensation system.

It had been a major campaign issue for incoming Governor Henry Hatfield. In his work as a coalfields physician, Hatfield recognized the need to support injured workers financially.

The system went into effect in October 1913. In the case of a fatal accident, workers’ compensation paid the funeral expenses of the deceased and a stipend for widows and children. In the case of partial disability, workers received half their salaries.

Jesse Wright / West Virginia Public Broadcasting

West Virginia teachers and school employees will be back on the job Thursday after a deadline passed for a controversial education reform bill to be revived. Leaders of teacher and school service personnel unions made the announcement following a Wednesday evening floor session in the House of Delegates.

Courtesy Coal Miners Respiratory Clinic

Miners and advocates rallied Wednesday at the West Virginia Capitol in support of a series of bills aimed at preventing and treating severe black lung disease.

Five bills introduced by lawmakers would make it easier to make qualify for state benefits and provide benefits to miners who have early-stage black lung.

It was the second day of a statewide teacher and service personnel walkout over a comprehensive education reform bill. We bring you up-to-date on the latest action, and we also bring you special reports on black lung-related legislation, economic development, and tourism.

It's time for you to choose the next story for Wild, Wondering West Virginia, our series devoted to answering questions about the Mountain State.

Last time, you voted for Bonnie Brown's question about Native American History in West Virginia. We're ready for round 2 and it's up to you to decide, West Virginia!

Perry Bennett / West Virginia Legislative Photography

Updated Wednesday, February 20, 2019 at 6:05 p.m. 

With the omnibus education bill effectively dead, the House of Delegates has turned its attention to providing pay raises for state employees, including teachers, service personnel and state police. The lower chamber’s Finance Committee cleared a bill Wednesday that would do just that.

Adobe Stock

The Supreme Court said Wednesday that the state of West Virginia unlawfully discriminated against a retired U.S. marshal when it excluded him from a more generous tax break given to onetime state law enforcement officers.

The court ruled unanimously for retired marshal James Dawson.

West Virgina is receiving national attention for the current issues surrounding the legislature and educators.  While it appears that students will be heading back to school shortly, it seems an opportune time to remember another time when West Virgina was in the national spotlight.

In 1943 several students exercising their first amendment rights took the fight up the the US Supreme Court.

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